Catching Up

We’re entering into the quiet time of year here. I still have plenty to do, but most days the only thing I have to do is keep wood in the stove. So I’ll pull out that long list of “winter projects”–things I don’t have time for when the weather is good. And before I know it, it will be spring again.

Since my last baby goat post, we’ve added a few more. I imagine some folks will enjoy seeing them.

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Freshly born

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Still a little wet behind the ears, but looking much more presentable a couple of hours later

Sometimes the mamas have their kids in a barn stall. That makes things easy for us. But sometimes they have them in distant corner of the pasture.

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This is the first view I had of that last kid and her mama

We still have a few more yet to be born this season. I’m hoping they arrive while the weather is still good.

 

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The Good and the Bad

First, the good.

We’ve added another kid to the herd, and she’s a beauty.

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The weather has been spectacular. It’s a gorgeous time of year here.

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Now, the bad.

Yellowjackets invaded our honeybee hive, ate all the brood and killed or ran off our bees.

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This is not only sad, but terribly disappointing. After all the trouble we’ve had keeping bees the past few years we finally had a strong healthy hive. We extracted awesome honey just a couple of weeks ago.

Doubly frustrating is how ecologically inefficient this is. Only the yellowjacket queen survives the winter. All those robbing murdering yellowjackets will soon be dead, and the bees they killed would’ve survived the winter. Sigh.

At this point I doubt we’ll try bees again.

To end on a positive note, our gardens are still flush with veggies and, with our without honeybees, our cup is running over.

 

 

Kidding Season

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Actually, this is one of our Cream Legbar roosters. He has nothing to do with kidding season. I just thought y’all might enjoy seeing him.

It’s always great to have new kids on the farm. This is an especially nice time of year for them to arrive.

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So…

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Some more babies arrived.

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We extracted honey.

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The gardens are giving us goodies.

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And the leaves changed.

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Greetings from the Farm

Well I’ve obviously had trouble returning to the blogging routine after our (wonderful) vacation.

But today I’ve been inspired to return, in order to introduce the blogosphere to our latest addition.

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Unstuck

Every now and then one of our goats will stick her head through the woven wire fence, and not be able to get it back out.

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A few days ago I found Carrie in that condition. Bless her heart. There’s no telling how long she’d been stuck there.

I carefully maneuvered her head through the fence, freeing her. Once free she ran toward the barn where her unconcerned friends and family were lounging, without the slightest indication of gratitude to her rescuer.

The novel I finished last winter is still a mere manuscript. I had hoped to announce its publication by now. But, alas, I have discovered that publishing a book is in many ways more difficult than writing one. My self-imposed September deadline will pass sans novel. And that’s OK.

Because my head is not stuck in a fence (even though I spent a decade behaving as if it was), we’re leaving for vacation today. Gardens, goats, writing projects and the like will have to wait a while.