Jim Wrenn

I’ve received enough feedback now to be able to say confidently that anyone who has enjoyed my blog posts here over the last ten years will likely also enjoy my novel Jim Wrenn.

Now available through libraries and bookstores. Also available at Amazon.com, of course.

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But for those without the time or inclination to read a novel (particularly when you can’t be sure it will be worth your time), I’ll offer this poem from Wendell Berry, which is the epigraph for the book. It is perfect, I think, for the story I’m trying to tell.

In time a man disappears
from his lifelong fields, from
the streams he has walked beside,
from the woods where he sat and waited.
Thinking of this, he seems to
miss himself in those places
as if always he has been there,
watching for himself to return.
But first he must disappear,
and this he foresees with hope,
with thanks. Let others come.

Wendell Berry
Sabbaths: 2007, VII

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On a Rainy Sunday

It’s been raining since morning, freezing as it lands and bending the branches of the trees. There’s wood in the stove and the animals are fed. It’s a good day to stay warm inside, and to finally put out another blog post.

Jim Wrenn is a hit. Locally, that is. Of course being a hit in our small community doesn’t make it a best-seller, by any stretch of the imagination. I’ll be lucky to recover my costs of publication. But it’s a story I wanted to tell and I’m glad I wrote it. The favorable reviews have encouraged me to write another one. I do have another story to tell, so I’ve been working on the sequel. I just wish I could type it out as fast as it comes to me.

We have seven new kids in the barn and, as always, they are a delight.

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Yes, it’s a cold wet winter day. But in less than a week it will be time to start seeds. Spring is on the way.