Jim Wrenn

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I am pleased to announce the publication of my novel Jim Wrenn, on the 100th anniversary of the event that inspired it.

The book is now available on Amazon (link HERE) and may also be ordered through libraries, independent book stores and from me directly (5962 Slatesville Road, Keeling VA 24566, $16.95, which includes shipping).

For folks in the area, I will be speaking at Reid Street Gallery in Chatham on January 16 at 6:00 p.m and at Brewed Awakening in Danville on January 27 at 2:00 p.m. At both events I will discuss the story and its historical background. Afterwards I will be available to sign books. There will be an event in the spring at Elmo Store in Halifax County, details to be announced later.

I am excited to introduce these characters to the public. They have come to mean quite a lot to me.

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44 comments on “Jim Wrenn

  1. NebraskaDave says:

    Bill, congrats on the new novel. How much would it be to get a signed copy of the book from you?

    Have a great book selling day. Wish I could come and hear you speak.

    Nebraska Dave

    Like

  2. shoreacres says:

    Nice way to introduce the book, with a connection to its roots. Congratulations!

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    • Bill says:

      Thanks Linda. I hope the book will be interesting for its historical background as well as for the story.

      Like

      • shoreacres says:

        It’s on my to-be-read list, just as soon as I finish up some other projects. I’m trying to get as much reading in as I can before spring arrives, and the temptation to be out and about with the camera becomes overwhelming!

        Like

  3. thesnowwoman says:

    Hi Bill,
    Congratulations on publication! I am looking forward to reading it. I am also going to put a request for my library to get a copy.
    Lori

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  4. Laurie Graves says:

    Congrats and good luck selling your book!

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    • Bill says:

      Thanks Laurie. While I have no objection to having a best-seller, my much more modest goal is just to recoup what I spent to get it published. πŸ™‚

      Like

  5. Congratulations Bill, how exciting, I too wish I lived closer to where you are going to speak, would love to see and meet you. Good luck on selling your book, I know if people give it a chance they will love it, you will soon be getting a check from me.

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  6. thecrazysheeplady says:

    Congratulations!

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  7. barnraised says:

    Congrats! πŸŽ‰

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  8. barnraised says:

    Question… is this an appropriate read to share with my 11 year old daughter?

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  9. DM says:

    Congrat’s Bill!~ I feel your joy… πŸ˜‰ DM

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  10. Hi Bill: Happy New Year. I don’t comment anymore, but I do check in on your posts regularly…and wanted to say congratulations on the new book. Funnily enough, another blogger I pay attention to used the phrase “practicing resurrection” today and it instantly brought to mind your recent post about this book: “we aren’t fully practicing resurrection without the useless goodness of making things”. ( http://sarahbessey.com/knit-one-purl-joy/ ) by which I don’t at all mean that your book is useless – not at all!. Another quote: “I do it because I was made to it, because it makes me feel fully alive to do it. Because I’m working out what God has already worked in.” So with these thoughts in mind, I wanted to add my voice to the chorus of those who appreciate your efforts and what you say, and how you do it, be it books, food, goats or whatever else you turn your creativity toward. Cheers, Dawn

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    • Bill says:

      Thanks so much Dawn. It’s great to hear from you. I appreciate the kind words and good wishes. The quote you share here fits perfectly with my frame of mind today as I am getting underway writing another one. I’m glad you shared it. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Candace says:

    Congratulations, Bill! I will check it out on Amazon.

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  12. Leigh says:

    Bill, absolutely congratulations on this! It’s a great feeling, isn’t it? I’ll see if I can’t get my library to order it, so it will be available for others to enjoy as well.

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  13. Dearest Bill,
    Got the signed book on Monday and husband Pieter has claimed it so far. He’s enjoying it so very much and that is good.
    You have done an outstanding job, describing the harsh living conditions of that era.
    Hope soon to find time myself for reading it.
    Congrats again and thanks for getting it signed!
    Mariette

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Thanks Mariette. I’m happy to know y’all are enjoying the book. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • Okay, a couple of days ago I finished reading your EXCELLENT book!
        A review has been left, with a photo. Tried hard to get that on right but for some reason it keeps turning left… Tried all options.
        You are a great writer, no doubt this stems from your skill of being able to read people so well and of course a love for family and history.
        Wish that all young people would read this book!
        Husband Pieter lived through the Great Depression and also through WWII and for me the Post WWII years were very harsh ones too. Ever since 1960, life has changed and often not all for the better. I’ve lived through neighbor help; genuine help from the heart and never for pay. That is nearly unthinkable for this time and age. Found that spirit back in the book and it did me good. Pieter often has told the stories about his Mom cooking additional food that he had to bring to very poor widows with children. Rough times back then.
        All we hear now is the cry about racism in relation to slavery… Guess our own parents and all our ancestors lived a life of a slave. And they still were content; one can only look up to that!
        We need more of such books.
        Mariette

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  14. Sam Gwynn says:

    Bill, it’s a fine book. I speak as a writer and retired English professor. I grew up in Eden, and my paternal grandparents (Bryants and Jamersons) were originally farmers from the “Maple Grove” area. My younger brother and I worked summers in the Spray Cotton Mill in the late sixties and seventies, and you get the details right, especially about the card room, which I always thought was the worst area in the mill. On the other side of the family, my grandfather was super at the Leaksville Woolen mill, and several aunts and uncles worked in textiles. Eden is pretty much a ghost town now, and I haven’t been “down to” Danville in years. I was an overhauler of spinning frames during my three summers in the mill, and I came to know and like many of the people who worked there, including the older ladies who were spinners (with their snuff and wood-shaving filled-spittoons strategically located throughout the room. The heat and the humidity were inescapable.
    Sam Gwynn

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  15. Cindy Zook says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and I am to lead a discussion on it at a book club tomorrow in Danville and cannot find any discussion questions. Can you help????? By the way, where is Maple Grove? I have been here 19 years and hadn’t heard of it until your book. Thank you!

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    • Bill says:

      Hey Cindy. I’m glad you enjoyed the book. I haven’t prepared any discussion questions to go along with it, but some of the questions from other book clubs have been: Do the lives of the characters seem real? What makes the book “local” (i.e. what do readers see in the story and characters that represent our community, its history and values)? Would the book be interesting and enjoyable to people outside our community? Why or why not? What are Jim Wrenn’s core values and how are they revealed in his life? What do you expect will happen with Bobby Hendricks? What will be his likely life path?

      Those are just a few that come to mind. I hope you have a good discussion.

      Maple Grove is a fictional place.

      Thanks again.
      Bill

      Like

      • Cindy Zook says:

        Thank you for the questions. We had a very good discussion and everyone seemed to agree that the setting in Danville was a major highlight because we knew many of the places and people who had worked in the mills. A general consensus is that we would love to have you come speak to our group sometime!

        Thank you!
        Cindy

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      • Bill says:

        I’d be happy to do that. The best way to communicate with me is via email: whiteflintbill at gmail dot com.

        Like

  16. Cindy Zook says:

    Great! I sent your contact info to our club Chairman. The group is the Danville LiteraryClub.

    Thanks!

    Like

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