Cooling Off

Back before television and air conditioning, at the end of hot summer days folks would sit on the porch to socialize, rest and cool off.

Honey bees still do that.

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21 comments on “Cooling Off

  1. I must have known you have bee hives, but I didn’t remember. Great to see them. Many owners of fruit trees in southern Ontario are fretting because they got no apples/pears this summer. They are wondering whether it was the lack of pollination by the bees, or simply the hot spring weather.

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    • Bill says:

      Most of our fruit trees didn’t bear this year, but it was because we had a late freeze, after the trees had already bloomed.

      We’ve kept bees for a long time, but it’s much more difficult now than it used to be. I’m happy to see this hive thriving, but it’s a challenge to keep them alive these days.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Susan says:

    We’ve noticed that as well with the hives on our property. We have a “bee guy” that keeps a lot of his hives here in the “off” season. He takes his all over the south in the winter to pollinate orchards. This is kind of their summer retreat/rest area. My garden certainly benefits from it.
    Another “hang-out” here for them is our birdbaths. It’s like the office watercooler………
    Have a great weekend

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    • Bill says:

      The office watercooler image makes me smile. Our bees like to come drink out of the chickens’ waterer. Now I’m going to think of it as the office watercooler. 🙂

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  3. Hi Cynthia, not sure where you are but, here in central Ontario, we’ve been short on precipitation since last fall and it may be that the fruit trees were set back by having so little snow cover, the winter that just went on and on and then the spring that never really happened… The pollination window here was very short before we slammed right into summer temps):): Both the early and late pears have very little fruit set, but the old MacIntosh is absolutely loaded, go figure):

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    • Bill says:

      Now I’m wondering if pollination was an issue here. I’ve been blaming our bad fruit year on a late freeze. This year we have a few apple trees that have lots of fruit, and a lot of trees that have now.

      Liked by 1 person

      • So, how are your girls doing so far this year, Bill?

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      • Bill says:

        Well, the best and most accurate answer is “I don’t know.” But I think they’re doing well. I haven’t looked in on them in about a month, and I have that on my priority to-do list. It would be nice to extract some honey this fall, after a couple of year without any.

        Liked by 1 person

      • You started out with a package of bees this year, if I remember correctly? If so, they’ve done very well indeed to have a harvest for you as well: ). Congrats to you both; )

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  4. NebraskaDave says:

    Bill, I don’t have hives nor do I see many bees in my garden but everything seems to get pollinated So, I guess they’re around somewhere..

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    • Bill says:

      There are lots of pollinators. An interesting factoid: honey bees are not native to North America. They were introduced by European settlers for honey and, mainly, for wax to make candles. Honey bees are excellent pollinators, but they’re not the only ones out there.

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  5. That’s great! Thanks for sharing.

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  6. We don’t have a bee hive but I swear our lavender is honey bee/bumble bee heaven! And the stuff blooms for months. 🙂 –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Scott says:

    That’s why I’m building a 12′ x 30′ front porch on my house. Oh yeah.

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