Bad Boys

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We may have to rethink how we pasture our goats.

I used to be careful with timing breeding and kidding. I separated the young females from their mothers when they were 3 months old, and weaned them in a different pasture until they were one year old. Only then would I put them in the pasture with the billy goat. Goats have a five month gestation period, so our young females were nearly a year and half old before they could have their first kids.

But a couple of years ago I decided to just leave them all together and let nature run its course.

Goats are sexually mature at 5 months old. At that age they’re the equivalent of teenage humans.

If you can imagine how teenagers behave, especially those with indifferent parents (not so difficult to imagine these days), then you can imagine how a bunch of young goats behave.

The oldest of our young bucks are now over 6 months old. That’s plenty old to begin doing their part to assure the survival of their species, and with a bunch of cooperative 5-6 month old females in the pasture, they’re eager to get started.

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And they were so cute when they were babies.

 

 

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23 comments on “Bad Boys

  1. shoreacres says:

    I’m really surprised they begin to reproduce at such a young age — but what do I know about goats? Not much, when you get right down to it. That one looks like he’s going to take his responsibility seriously. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      At five months they’re good to go. With a life expectancy of 8-10 years, it probably makes sense for them to get started that young.

      All the young dudes have been headbutting each other, making themselves aromatic, and otherwise pretending to be big bucks. Abraham ignores them and the grown up does just push them away. So they concentrate their attentions on the young does.

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  2. They are still cute!

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  3. Yup, that brown one is a horny fellow, alright. Look at the horns on his head!

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  4. Carol Samsel says:

    They are sweet LOOKING animals and that young buck does look determined to fulfill his manly duties 🙂

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  5. Laurie Graves says:

    Ah, nature! On and on it thrums.

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  6. NebraskaDave says:

    Bill, I see that spark in Billy’s eye. Looks like there will be plenty of goats running around in about five months. I do like the brown look on the off spring of the new billy. Do have concern about brothers and sisters breeding? I’ve always been told that not a good idea in animal husbandry.

    Have a great natural goat living day.

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    • Bill says:

      We’ve never had any issues with siblings. I know it’s not ideal, but that’s the way herds operate.

      I’m kind of hoping that all this frolicking doesn’t produce any kids this fall, at least not from the youngsters. I probably should’ve separated the young bucks but we have a sale coming up next month and I was hoping to make it that long.

      I wasn’t counting on the spring fever.

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  7. That sure makes cows look a lot better to me 😉

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  8. Scott says:

    Who’s to say there aren’t bad girls too? 😉
    I lost track; did you say earlier that you were trying to time the pregnancies last year? (the recent round of babies) or did you leave that up to nature?

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  9. Sounds an awful lot like a rabbits approach to nature to me, Bill. 🙂 –Curt

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    • Bill says:

      Well, no one is controlling when the deer breed and they seem to multiply quite successfully. 🙂

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      • It’s called eliminating the natural predators. I still think you could use a cougar, Bill. Unfortunately, a cougar might not recognize the difference between deer and goats. Mmm, tasty kid on the menu today… –Curt

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  10. So, a little Woodstock love fest going on there … that’s that dern communal living for you … :)))

    Like

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