Ahead of the Rain

Yesterday was a 15 hour planting marathon here. I put in all of our transplants, finishing up by headlamp.

IMG_9950.JPG

Cherry blossoms at sunrise

If they grow, and if the deer don’t eat them first, we should have lots of lettuce, Chinese cabbage, bok choy, kale, collards, broccoli and Swiss chard (to go along with our direct-seeded crops).

IMG_9961.JPG

IMG_9962.JPG

I’m a little rusty after a quiet winter, so all the bending and squatting has me feeling a little stiff and creaky this morning as I wait for the coffee to kick in.

So why didn’t I just break it into a two-day job? After all, here in the South today is the traditional day for planting gardens.

The answer is that it was important to get it done ahead of last night’s forecast rain. For planting, the soil can’t be muddy. And it’s important to give the transplants a nice drink of water after they’re in the ground.

But it didn’t rain. Drats.

It looks like I will probably spend a lot of today laying drip irrigation lines.

 

 

Advertisements

15 comments on “Ahead of the Rain

  1. Susan says:

    That’s how it goes in the garden or on the farm—a winter of relaxation and then WHAM–too much to do.
    Everything looks so tidy and neat—hope you have a bountiful harvest. And no deer!!!
    🙂
    And if you figure out the no deer part, let the rest of us in on it!!

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Deer. My stomach starts hurting just from thinking about them. I went to double fencing last fall and they learned to jump both fences. I’m going to try that again this year, but with the fences a little wider apart. We’ll see what happens. In the meantime, I’m going to think happy deer-free thoughts. 🙂

      Like

  2. avwalters says:

    They look lovely–such an invitation to the season. Our traditional planting day is May 15th. But it’s been warm(ish) and snow free for weeks. It started to be tempting. Good thing that saner minds prevailed, as yesterday a late season storm dumped a good eight inches on us. Enjoy the peace of mind that drip irrigation lines can bring.

    Like

  3. It certainly looks as if you could do with some rain!
    Best of luck with the watering…

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Clouds teased us all day yesterday, but no rain. Spring is usually wet here and likely it will start raining soon. If not, we’re fortunate to be able to irrigate.

      Like

  4. Laurie Graves says:

    No planting in Maine yet. In central Maine, there’s still a bit of snow on the ground, and my husband plans to get the wood furnace going today. Still a little brisk in northern New England.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Here we plant cool season crops in March (soil permitting). Next up is sweet corn around April 20. By the first week of May the summer crops can go in.

      One of the things I’ve enjoyed most gardening-blogging is learning how the seasons arrive differently around the country and world. Soon enough you’ll be planting and enjoying those extra-long Maine summer days. 🙂

      Like

  5. valbjerke says:

    Hmmm – seems it was just recently someone was suggesting to me I should ‘pace’ myself 😄 ……. 15 hours straight?
    I envy you your soil – I’ve long since given up on our clay. All my gardens are in three foot high raised beds – and I’m still two months away from planting.
    Here’s to hoping the deer find something else to eat this year.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      15 hours is just a normal day for you Val. 🙂 I’m not tough enough (yet) to do it everyday.

      As for our soil, that picture is from the garden that has the best soil on our farm. Over half of the gardens are almost pure red clay. I plant into rock hard clods most of the time. I’m surprised anything grows in it. We have a bunch of raised beds too and if I was starting over again I’d have a lot more of them, and skip fighting the clay!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Oh, drats. I thought the rain would come and you would spend today resting.

    Like

  7. Rain would have been best. Sigh. They look good!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s