Getting Their Big Girl Tags

When our female kids are weaned and ready to move to the next stage of life here, I give them an ear tag. The tags help me with record keeping until I learn their names. Cherie learns goat faces easier than I do, so for her the tags are unnecessary. In time I won’t need them either and if a goat loses her tag as an adult, I don’t both replacing it. But at this stage of their life I find the tag useful and as far as I can tell the goats don’t mind wearing them.

We have four young does sporting new tags now.

Here’s Rosanna, before and after.

IMG_8400

A few minutes later

A few minutes later

Scarlet

IMG_8422

Annie

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Fannie declined to pose. This is the best I could do.

She's number 85

She’s number 85

Meanwhile we have ten very pregnant Mamas, due any moment. I’ve been expecting to have new baby pictures to share for the past two weeks.

Nellie on October 13

Nellie on October 13

October 25

October 25

October 26. She's been seemingly about to pop for over a week now. The others are almost as big.

October 26. She’s been seemingly about to pop for over a week now. The others are almost as big.

Wendy is equally ready to pop, but less tolerant of close-ups

Wendy is equally ready to pop, but less tolerant of close-ups

Still waiting, but looking forward to a whole bunch of kids soon. Hopefully in about 6 months, it be will time for some new ear tags.

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24 comments on “Getting Their Big Girl Tags

  1. Sue says:

    Oh my goodness–LOL!—what bellies they have!! They must be close!!
    Good luck

    Like

  2. I’ve never seen ear tags before but a guy has to do what a guy has to do. 🙂 I remember the year we had baby goats, and I’d sit in the barn rocking all three in my lap. Should I admit that in print? LOL 🙂

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  3. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, new life is once again about to happen at White Flint Farm. It’s always an exciting time when birthing begins. I can remember when the milk cows (13) began the birthing process. They were staggered out a little more than your goats but still the anticipation was exciting. New born baby animals of any kind are so dog gone cute. Even pigs are cute when they are first born. Of course your pigs are always cute and having a good time. Many blessings on your goat birthing season. May the death rate be low and no deaths for the new mothers.

    Have a great birthing anticipation day.

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    • Bill says:

      This is a good time of year for kidding. They give us the most trouble in the dead of winter. We’ve got at least ten set to kid any day now. It’s going to be fun.

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  4. gatheringplaceseasonfour says:

    toward fullness of time – all creation groans.

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  5. Joanna says:

    Ear tags for farm animals are compulsory in Europe so that they can be tracked. I’m surprised it isn’t in the US

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    • Bill says:

      There was an effort to make it compulsory here but the resistance was so great that they dropped the effort and made it voluntary instead. But they’re required in order to sell an animal at a livestock market, so whenever we take a got to the market we have to apply the government tag. The yellow ones we use aren’t official. They just help me know who’s who.

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      • Joanna says:

        That makes sense. We haven’t attached tags to our newest, but again if we have to sell them we will have to. We have the tags to hand though

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  6. You know I know what tagging is like :). As Joanna says, much of the rest of the world has gone to compulsory tagging for most livestock, but I know that here in Canada some species are still exempt – probably because they’re not a significant part of the meat industry, and I think it might also depend on scale in some circumstances. Certainly all pigs, cattle and sheep have to be tagged here. The tags are going towards electronic now, so that the handlers can just scan the ear and get a read out on that particular animal – birth, parentage, etc and the animal’s temperature.

    Those poor does – they must be so uncomfortable. Hope all the birthing goes well.

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    • Bill says:

      There was a lot of resistance from small farmers to mandatory tagging when the USDA tried to implement it. They eventually backed down but we do have to apply the tags before we can sell our animals at a livestock market. The tags we use on the farm are not official–they’re just to help me keep track of the goats. We’ve never tagged a pig.

      As for the mamas, as of dark tonight they weren’t in labor. I expected today to be the day. Maybe tonight…

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  7. Dearest Bill,
    Love your sense of humor, the way you write about life at the farm and feelings.
    You are right, one will learn how to recognize those faces but it takes time!
    The kids you tagged have such cute faces, they are friendly in general I guess.
    And the two pregnant ones will soon get rid of their enormous freight to carry around. One wonders with such frail bodies but nature can handle a lot.
    Good luck!
    Hugs,
    Mariette

    Like

    • Bill says:

      I can identify all of our older goats by their faces now. I recognize the voices of some of them too. They all have unique personalities and I enjoy getting to know them. But when they’re starting out the numbers help me remember them. 🙂

      I’m surprised to say that we’ve gone another day without goat babies. I keep saying this, but any day now…

      Liked by 1 person

  8. shoreacres says:

    I was introduced to tagging when I was at Konza Prairie, and learned how they use it for bison herd management there. But I understand the practical needs on a more basic level, too. I think it would take some time to learn to read goat faces!

    Surely it won’t be long before we’re introduced to some new members of the family. My goodness — there’s pregnant, and then there are those goats!

    Like

  9. Wow, Bill, those are really pregnant goats!

    Like

  10. avwalters says:

    I’d keep those mama goats away from sharp objects, or there could be an explosion.

    Liked by 1 person

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