Raising Pigs

Raising pigs is one of the most enjoyable things we do here on the farm.

Waiting for their supper

Waiting for their supper

They have great personalities.

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They don’t need much attention from us and I don’t have to worry about predators eating them.

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And of course we like being able to give folks an alternative to factory-raised pigs.

We’re a pig-friendly farm.

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16 comments on “Raising Pigs

  1. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    Bill, your “guys” are SO cute and they seem incredibly curious: )

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    • Bill says:

      It’s hard for me to get good pictures of them, because when I go in their pasture they crowd so close me that I can’t get a shot (other than an extreme close up of the snout!).

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      • Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

        LOL, sounds like my dog.
        As a matter-of-fact, they DO pretty much act like dogs, don’t they? Or like little kids, even… “Whatcha doin’?”, “What’s that?” “Where ya goin’, can I come too?” “Intelligence”is so incredibly dependant on “the more you put in, the more you get out” ratios, regardless of the species, hey? I can’t imagine how such(any): intelligent creatures could ever survive the mind-numbing lack of stimulation/ insult of over-crowding/ inhumane conditions of “AgriBusiness”… (Is there an Imojii for “disdain”?) So you GO, White Flint! (And, I know yours isn’t for a bit, yet, but ours is this weekend; so I’ll just say “Happy Thanksgiving!” while it’s top of mind; )

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  2. youarehereuk says:

    Pigs always seem to be smiling!

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  3. shoreacres says:

    You may be pig-friendly, but your pigs appear to be pretty darned people-friendly, too. One of the best things about a collection of photos like this is that it puts the lie to any statements implying that a pig is a pig is a pig. The variety in their lives is the best argument against … well, you know. That other kind of pig-farming. πŸ™‚

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    • Bill says:

      I’m in full agreement with that, of course. They have unique personalities and they’re happy in the company of humans. The thought of confining such curious, playful and intelligent animals in tiny cages in a building for their entire miserable lives should be appalling to anyone who knows anything about a pig’s true nature.

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  4. So good to see Happy Pigs β™₯

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  5. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, always liked pigs. Well except when they escaped and the neighbors would call and say our pigs were on the highway. I still contend that they are the smartest of the farm animals and the best escape artists. They are so real life. It does seem that they are always having a good time. Our pigs were always pasture pigs which I believe pigs were meant to be. They actually would pack on the pounds faster because of all the skim milk from the 13 cows we milked. They would suck down and squabble over the 15 gallons of milk twice a day as if it were their last meal. I think we would save one back for us and the rest would go to market. Some people got some good pork from us. My last year before college I raised about 15 pigs and it almost paid for all of college that year. Today, the sale of 15 pigs wouldn’t come close to paying for a year of college. Pigs are indeed a fun animal to have around a homestead.

    Organic Wesley chapter six is mostly good speculation about what Wesley would think about today’s food market. I would say that You have hit the mark with all the assumptions of would he would think about our food system today. The segment of natural medicine over pharmaceuticals surprised me. I didn’t know that that had many manufactured medicines in his time. The comment about the compounding of medicine was only to prolong the problem and to swell the doctor’s bill made me laugh. In some cases it could fit today’s medicine. The segment of ingredients in food was profound. The amount of corn sweetener and other by products made from corn that are part of our food chain was a bit eye opening for me. It’s no surprise to me that Wesley would be on board with today’s food movement and be for the environmental stewardship of both land and animals. From what I’ve learned about Wesley in your book, I would agree that Wesley would definitely prefer organic food in both plant and animal form. It was some what shocking to me that Wesley would say tea is harmful and we shouldn’t drink it. He must have been talking about green or black tea because I would guess that herbal tea would be beneficial to health. Most of chapter six has been discussed over the last few months on your blog but it still was a good read for me. On to globalization and local economies.

    Have a great raising pigs day.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Bill says:

    If I recall correctly, the industry average profit per hog is about $40. We raised 7 this year, so if we sold them into the industrial system (and assuming we fed them the cheap GMO feed, rather than our locally grown non-GMO feed), then we could expect to turn a $280 profit for the year. Of course if we were raising 20,000 of them in a CAFO, our profit would be $800,000. If we raised 12 million pigs per year, as Smithfield does, then that $40 profit per pig would look really good. Of course that comes at the expense of the pig and the consumer.

    We’re fortunate to have customers who will pay us a fair price for the best possible pork.

    As for Wesley and his tea, he quit drinking it for 12 years because his physician advised him to. He said it was damaging his nerves. But later, when his doctor told him tea would be beneficial for him, he resumed drinking it again and drank it until the day he died. As much as he loved tea, he was willing to give it up if it was detrimental to his health. So glad you’re enjoying the book Dave.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

      Must be the cynic in me to be thinking “Plus Γ§a change, plus c’est la mΓͺme chose…” Don’t eat this, it’s not good for you… Oh, no! We were wrong, this is good for you. (Margarine vs Butter & back again)
      Guess GranMama’s “All things in moderation” is still the best advice, ’cause, no matter what it is, too much of any one thing is always a bad thing.
      Tea, anyone?; )

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  7. I’m all in on pigs except for that excruciating screeching sound they make when they’re distressed. Hated when we had to put the staples in their noses. Otherwise, pigs are cool.

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    • Bill says:

      They’re definitely cool. πŸ™‚ We don’t ring noses here. The only time I’ve ever had them squeal like that is sometimes when I pick up a piglet. Most of the time they’re so tame they don’t even holler then.

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  8. barnraised says:

    I always love your pig pictures, they are so cute! I actually caught a couple of funny ones at the county fair recently that I’ve been meaning to post. I could see what you mean about their personalities!

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