A Reminder

I enjoy finding reminders of those who preceded us here.

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This land has been sustaining people for a long time.

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21 comments on “A Reminder

  1. DM says:

    Nice! My dad used to talk about finding artifacts in the plowed fields after a rain when he was a kid. also there are several caves just a mile or two from us along a river that used to be loaded with this sort of thing…I read that in the 1920’s a local boy scout leader used to take the boys out there and hunt for them.

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    • Bill says:

      My father told me he would search the fields after a rain and sell the arrowheads he found to a collector in town. I’ve got a fairly decent collection I’ve accumulated over the years, but it pales in comparison to those a neighbor has collected. She’s got the gift for spotting them, even while riding high in the cab of a big tractor.

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  2. Joanna says:

    Most of what we find around here are exploded ordinance from the Second World War, we have even found a live grenade and rocket launchers.

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  3. avwalters says:

    So far, all we find are the rounded rocks carried and dropped by glaciers. (Oh, except for the still that we found in pieces when we first bought the property.)

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  4. Dee Ready says:

    Dear Bill, the treasure trove box on the nightstand next to my bed contains two stones that have been with me for decades. When I hold them I feel connected to all creation. That is, for me, a moment of great gratitude. Peace.

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    • Bill says:

      Welcome back Dee! I’m very glad to hear from you.

      That’s wonderful. I have stones on my desk to remind me of times past.
      It is important to be reminded of our connection to all of creation. It’s nice that the stones help you with that.

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  5. BeeHappee says:

    My kid has been digging up the yard for hours and days, like a vole, in hopes of finding some treasure… and hauling rocks into the house because each one is a treasure.
    Our park district went around recently measuring tree diameters and determining ages of trees in our woods, and most came back as being from early and mid 1800s… Wow, sometimes I walk in the woods, and just enjoy the thought that those trees had seen many bird, deer and human generations come and go.

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    • Bill says:

      I used to hope to find treasure when I was a kid. I hoped that the mysterious missing Confederate gold might turn up here (I confess that I sometimes still hope that. 🙂 )

      We have some ancient oaks on our place. I like to imagine them as seedlings and, like you, think of all they’ve been a part of.

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  6. shoreacres says:

    There was an old cooking mound on the place up in the hill country. It was easy to find chips and flakes at any time, but after every heavy rain, another layer of soil would be washing away, and arrowheads, scrapers, and other tools sometimes were uncovered.

    That country was seabed at one time, so there are mementos of even older dwellers around. I’ve got a basket filled with various rocks from around the world, but it’s had a few fossilized clams, snails, and so on added to it over the years. It’s so strange to pick up a stone clam on top of a hill, and realize that over the millenia things changed so radically.

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    • Bill says:

      I’ve found a fossilized clam too. Once upon a time folks believed that kind of thing was proof of the Flood. 🙂

      For every interesting artifact I’ve found, I’ve probably overlooked or failed to recognize far more. I sometimes wonder what people in the distant future will find interesting about the evidence we leave behind.

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  7. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, ha, yeah, no history on my garden land. There were lots of artifacts on the property but just from people dumping. I’ve mostly removed the bulk of them but every now and then I’ll run across another bit of evidence that it had been the neighborhood dump for many years. The creepiest things were doll heads with no eyes. I found many of those. Old car parts was another thing and who could forget appliances like microwaves. I have a steep tree covered bank in the back of the garden area so people have taken the freedom of dumping old tires to roll down the hill until hitting a tree. I mined about 30 tires from the 168 foot bank. I’m still trying to figure out something to do with them. The current plan is to cut the side walls out; fill them with soil and compost; place them around the outside of the wooden fence; and plant flowers in them. The main accomplishment for this is to keep the digging wildlife from digging under the wooden fence. I’ve always been told and many articles state that old tires will leach toxic chemicals into the soil. I plan on testing the soil before I begin this project and then take a couple samples every year to actually see if it is true.

    Have a great treasure hunting day.

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    • Bill says:

      Well it’s far more common for me to find “junk” here than to find arrowheads. Hardly a day goes by I don’t find broken glass, nails, old pieces of tin, etc. I’ve found tires, plow points, pieces of wire, etc. Even though the folks who lived here the last 300 years or so left a lot less trash behind than our generation will, they still left a lot more than the folks who lived here before them.

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  8. Where I grew up had been a sacred site for the Maidu Indians. They would bring their dead from miles around to be cremated. Consequently, we found many arrowheads and beads as kids. It was always a thrill. –Curt

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    • Bill says:

      I don’t find them often–usually one or two a year. But it’s still a thrill every time I do.
      By the way, reading about your anti-smoking work is what inspired me to make the connection I describe in the previous day’s post “A Shame”

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      • Noted and responded, Bill. I was a bit behind on my blog reading. Peggy, who is president of the local Friends of the Library, had her big book sale this week and I had husband duties to be supportive. 🙂 –Curt

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