Transitioning

We’re finishing off the last of the watermelons. The tomatoes are all gone. As much as I love the way summer tastes, it’s time to say goodbye to summer and hello to fall.

Now the greens that can’t survive in the heat of summer are thriving. And we replace one set of delicious food with another.

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So it’s goodbye to September, to tomatoes, watermelon and okra; and hello to October, to kale, collards, spinach, chard and Asian greens.

See you next year summer. Welcome back fall.

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6 comments on “Transitioning

  1. shoreacres says:

    It’s 67 here this morning, and the humidity is down. Oh, my. Aren’t we all happy? It won’t last, but for a few mornings we can have the windows open and enjoy the coolth.

    I forgot to tell you — last Saturday, my farmers lost their whole load of the fall’s first carrots on the Gulf Freeway. One of their workers hadn’t secured the trailer properly, and out they went. Sigh. I felt so sorry for them. Given the number of things farmers can’t control, it’s a shame when something that’s so easily controlled goes wrong. Ah, well. Carrots tomorrow!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      Ouch, that hurts even to think about it. I really dislike pulling a trailer, in part because I’m always afraid it’s going to come unhitched somehow.

      It’s in the 50s and raining here. Has felt cold all day. And we don’t usually cut on the heater until November. Transitioning…

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  2. Laurie Graves says:

    It was 45 here this morning, but no frost yet 😉 Yes, farewell to tomatoes and melons. Hello to apples and potatoes and winter squash. Must be the Mainer in me, but I really love fall vegetables and fruit.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      We’re about 3 weeks away from our average first frost date, but it feels cold today, with all the wind and rain and temps in the 50s. Adios summer. I do love the foods of summer, but the foods of fall are awesome too. And with all this rain we have mushrooms coming in like crazy. Still plenty of great stuff to eat!

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  3. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, it is sad that the summer is over and Fall has begun but as you state each season has a range of food to eat. There’s no fall garden planting here this year. I’m concentrating on garden structure again and will be working on the corn fortress for next year’s sweet corn. I’m hoping to get my first sweet corn harvest next year. That will be a cause of celebration. I have bought the Spring flower bulbs to plant in the rejuvenated flower bed that has so needed to be freshened up. I’m getting better at flowers and hopefully this bed will be much better than the one that’s there now. Since I come from a row crop farmer background, that’s how I planted flowers. Yeah, I’ve learned that’s now how you plant flowers. Flowers need to be planted in clumps and groups. It goes against everything I know about planting crops. o.O

    I received your book yesterday. Thank you so much for a signed copy and your check should be reaching you with in a day or two. So for (which is only the first chapter) it’s been a great read filled with understandable information that really explains what the food issues are and how we got to where we are today with these issues. I’m thinking that I’ll have to read this book more than once. Once now and then again during the slow Winter months. I’m almost certain this book will be one of select few that will be on my special reading shelf above the desk in my bedroom. Only those books that I really like make it to that shelf.

    Have a great fall salad day.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      So glad you’re enjoying the book Dave. I think some people are going to get bogged down in Chapter One (even though it started out twice that long!), but it’s necessary background to what follows.

      Fortunately Senor Joaquin has veered to the east, so we’re been spared a full on hurricane. But it’s still raining, even though not as heavily as we’d feared. So far so good, but I seriously doubt the garden is going to dry up enough to permit me to plant garlic and onions in a couple of weeks!

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