Farmers Markets

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The success of the local food movement depends upon people taking the time and making the effort to visit their local farmers markets. When they do, it’s a win-win: resilient local economies and the survival of traditional family farms, in exchange for the best food in the world.

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23 comments on “Farmers Markets

  1. Sue says:

    We stopped at our local farm market just yesterday. I was encouraged by all the folks shopping there.
    Every year there seems to be more and more people—I’m so happy to see that.
    And it’s a great resource for folks like me that had an invasion of chipmunks wipe out their entire crop of peas
    😦

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    • Bill says:

      Sorry about your peas Sue. Competing with wildlife for food can sure be frustrating.

      Farmers market popularity continues to grow. I too find that encouraging.

      Like

  2. Aggie says:

    I bought 80% of my food from Local Harvest market when I lived in Houston. What a gift it was.

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    • Bill says:

      As rare as that is, it’s happening more and more now. It’s good to know that kind of option exists.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Aggie says:

        Having traveled the country, I realize how progressive Houston, TX is in the aspect of farmer’s markets… In a city of 5 million I don’t believe that the farmers sold out at the end of the day… Interestingly, the produce was way better than store bought, but way less flavorful than what I eat from Dad’s or my garden.

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  3. BeeHappee says:

    Wow, you have some beautiful hard working young ladies at your stand!
    Which reminds me, it is Saturday morning and I am off to our Farmers market.

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  4. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, farmer’s market day. Yea, I mostly frequent the roadside stands. They have all the vegetables that are in season without the crowds or parking issues. Road or parking lot stands in urban areas exist every where in my city. They are mostly located on the home to work routes and in the parking lots of major stores that don’t sell groceries. Most of the produce sold are from local farms. When I say local, it’s a stretch because some of the produce comes from surrounding states of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Colorado. Of course the best watermelons come from Texas. The soil and climate just seem to be right for growing watermelons in Texas. The soil and climate here in Nebraska is good for most any thing that can be grown in the window of 155 frost free days.

    Tomatoes are starting to ripen but still not the flush that I’m used to during the month of August. I contribute it to the night time temperatures in the sixties. It’s great for sleeping but not so much for ripening tomatoes. Cucumbers are growing gang busters with harvest by the bucket load. I think I over planted just a little this year. I’m eating a lot of tomato, cucumber, onion salads right now. I just can’t get enough of the juicy taste of a fresh tomato right off the vine and the sweet taste of a cucumber still warm from the sunshine. It makes a gardener feel good to eat a fresh salad all from the garden, don’t you think. It must be invigorating to be able to eat mostly from your land. Fish and deer would be a great asset to have.

    Have a great farmer’s market day.

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    • Bill says:

      Yessir. It’s hard to beat a fresh salad made from things you grew yourself. We’re enjoying good summertime food now too. The tomatoes are coming in strong, but our cucumbers are on the way out. We’ve got lots of watermelons. We’re fortunate to have a climate that’s good for growing almost anything. Come see us and you can tell us how our Virginia watermelons compare to the Texas melons. 🙂

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  5. avwalters says:

    I’m with Dave on the roadside stands, especially the ones where I get to know the farmer. We still like in an area quaint enough that some of the stands are not manned–just a cashbox left out for your share–and the system is still working. I’ve only heard of theft from a stand once–for firewood–in the police blotter. It turned out the guy had gone back home for his wallet and he was “caught” on his return to pay the tab.

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    • Bill says:

      It’s great that you’re in a place where the honor system works. There’s a local guy who sells honey that way. I stopped to get some last year and it looked like the jar hadn’t been emptied in a while. There was a lot of cash in there. I got my honey and made change out of the jar. That’s the kind of world I want to live in.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. ain't for city gals says:

    We are so grateful for our little farmers market….on the average 5 vendors just selling what extra they have. Only one is “big time” and they are called Rabbit Run…and I can’t imagine the work they do to keep things going. We have done well on our commitment to not buy from the grocery stores this summer and I am trying to buy for the freezer for the winter. I realize how lucky we are to be able to afford this ….

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    • Bill says:

      It’s really great that you’re getting your food from local farms. I like to think of that as an act of defiance against the empire. 🙂 And you get superior food to boot.

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  7. barnraised says:

    Absolutely! We missed ours this morning….riding instead 🙂 But I’m going to hit the smaller Thursday one during the week.

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    • Bill says:

      We had a nice crowd at our market today, even though it’s the last weekend before school starts (which usually diverts a lot of shoppers to back-to-school shopping instead). It’s nice that you have a midweek option there. We sell at a smaller market on Tuesday afternoons now. It’s good for the farms to have that option too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • barnraised says:

        Yes, that second option is really great because-even though the Saturday one is bigger and funner-we are often busy on Saturday’s and it’s good to get there mid-week.

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  8. EllaDee says:

    Farmers markets have made such a difference to my life. I’m truly grateful to people like you and Cherie who make them possible, all over the world but particularly here in the city. I love my Saturday mornings where I drag my nanna trolley to and come back from laden with food for the week, and my chats with the stallholder many of whom travel hundreds of kilometres to be there. 🙂

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    • Bill says:

      I’ve grown to love the social atmosphere of the farmers market. We’ve made lots of friends and it is a joy to be able to talk about our food with people who really care about it and value our work. Contrast that to the experience of shopping in a supermarket.

      As I’ve said before, without people like you there would be no farmers markets. Those who take the time to shop as you do, make it possible for folks like us to keep producing good food.

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  9. Laurie@hinterlands.me says:

    Hear, hear! Love farmers’ markets.

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  10. associatedluke says:

    In Lancaster PA, we had a GREAT farmer’s market. Central Market is the oldest indoor market in the country, so it claims. We knew the names of the farmers who sold us free-range chickens and eggs. Joel, the Amish dude with an I-phone who sold us our grass fed beef who I keep in touch with in Facebook. The crazy herb guy who was a hoot.

    We miss it. Sylvania and Toledo OH have good ones. We need to get over our snobbishness and grief of missing Central and get down there. Thanks for the post and the inspiration!

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    • Bill says:

      If we had to move to a different market I’d miss all the regulars and our fellow vendors, but my guess is that we’d make new friends and meet a new fun group of vendors and farmers. I’ve never heard anyone complain that their farmer’s market is no fun or doesn’t have good food. Hoping you discover a great new group of people there soon. 🙂

      Like

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