Even More of Nature’s Bounty

We could survive here as hunter/gatherers, and we’d eat well. But I wouldn’t want to have to do it. Cultivation just produces too much delicious food that I wouldn’t want to have to give up.

We’re in the heart of summer now, and that means lots of great food. Right now we’re producing (and eating) cantaloupes, tomatoes, eggplant, cucumbers, summer squash, peppers, watermelons, acorn squash, potatoes and green beans.

German Johnson heirloom tomatoes

German Johnson heirloom tomatoes

Hale's Best heirloom cantaloupe

Hale’s Best heirloom cantaloupe

A better shot of lambsquarters. This just came up wild in an overgrown garden.

A better shot of lambsquarters. This just came up wild in an overgrown garden.

Crimson Sweet watermelons

Crimson Sweet watermelons

Still to come are white beans, black beans, October beans, okra, butternut squash, spaghetti squash and delicata squash. And today I started broccoli, kale, collards, cabbage and Chinese cabbage seeds. We’ll start planting fall gardens soon.

So with game animals, domesticated animals, wild foods and cultivated crops, we have all the food we could possibly want, and more.

Whatever else may happen, as long as we keep our health, we shouldn’t have to worry about going hungry here.

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19 comments on “Even More of Nature’s Bounty

  1. daphnegould says:

    I keep watching my melons grow every day. I’m probably still about three weeks off though. Melon season is one of my favorites. It is very short here, but so delicious.

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    • Bill says:

      I love it when the melons are in too. With our long hot summers we don’t have any trouble growing them. Here they’re part of the taste of August.

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  2. Sue says:

    And keeping your health is MUCH easier with the way you choose to eat.
    I’m so envious of your melons and tomatoes. I’m not even close yet, and already night time temps are starting their August dip. Sigh.

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    • Joanna says:

      I sympathise Sue. My husband and I shared the first tomato today – so late!

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    • Bill says:

      Fresh veggies from the garden not only taste great, but they’re nutrient-dense and chocked full of health-sustaining goodness. This is our time of the year for melons and tomatoes. They’re at their peak. And our temps are still brutally hot. Great for growing hot weather crops.

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  3. Laurie@hinterlands.me says:

    Such bounty! Those melons look delicious. Unfortunately, the melons grown in Maine are often—though not always—not as tasty as those grown in the South. Not enough warm weather, I think.

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    • Bill says:

      Melons (the ones we grow at least) like hot weather. The ones we grow probably wouldn’t do well where you are, and vice versa.

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      • Laurie@hinterlands.me says:

        There are melons that grow well here, but they just don’t have the same vibrant taste that southern melons have. I expect that no matter the variety, hot weather is a deciding factor. I envy your melons. Good thing we have blueberries and apples as a consolation.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. ain't for city gals says:

    I always say “as long as I have my health I can do anything”…

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  5. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, yea, let the harvest begin. It’s what all the gardeners look forward to doing. All the hopes and dreams finally come true at harvest time. Those melons are looking good.

    My sweet corn is a total loss again this year. I’m very close to having the garden area completely closed in with a six foot wooden fence. My neighbor who has his own garden area at Terra Nova Gardens planted some kind of decorative corn that grew almost 10 feet high. The ears on the stalk are nearly head high. The raccoons left it alone so far. Probably doesn’t taste as good as bodacious sweet corn or perhaps they can’t reach it with the ears so high. It’s not a corn to eat but the many colored kernels kind that are for decorations. Cucumbers are coming in by the bucket full. There’s always that one missed cucumber that turns into a huge melon. I cut one up just to see what it would taste like and even the behemoth cuke was tasty and not bitter. Green and Wax beans are just about finished for this year and the green peppers have finished their first flush and are setting the buds for another round. The tomatoes are starting to dribble in faster than I can eat them. The potatoes are drying up and the onions are too. It’s time to start thinking about fall and what to plant for a harvest in October. My area has just a couple days over 70 before Jack Frost comes back to the area. That’s a pretty good amount of time to grow the fall plants.

    I agree that foraging is all but a lost skill. Unfortunately, living in a GMO friendly state, foraging and hunting is not so pure. The corn fed deer have been feasting on the GMO corn and water run off from chemicals put on the fields collect in the ponds and rivers. Of course the Parks and Recreation say that it’s perfectly safe to eat fish from the ponds and rivers. Some one once told me that there’s no such thing as organic food any more. For my area that’s probably true. The air, water, and soil has been polluted. But still we can come close to pure organic if we try. Terra Nova Gardens is not organic by any means but I don’t use chemicals to enhance the harvest. It’s as close to organic as I can get it. My fertilizer is the uncontaminated grass clippings during the summer and the leaf/grass mixture during the fall.

    Have a great harvesting day.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      Dang Dave. Sorry to hear about your corn. I’ve had my share of wildlife problems this summer so I can relate. I lost all of our corn to raccoons two out of the last 3 years. My estimated harvest date is 8/13. We’ll see if they leave us any.

      Glad to know you’re harvesting plenty of other good things. That’s the way it’s been with us. Even though our production (and therefore our farm revenue) is way down thanks to our neighborhood deer herds, we’ve still got more than enough to keep us fed like royalty.

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  6. bobraxton says:

    6th August we leave for short Kenya mission trip. These photographs would be “scrumtious” (SP? obviously) for folks there to see.

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  7. smcasson says:

    We planted Hale’s Best last year and loved it. I’m thinking of planting a fall garden too.

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    • Bill says:

      Hale’s Best is the only cantaloupe we plant any more. I think it is hands down the best of any I’ve had.

      Fall is usually our best season here. I love fall gardening.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. BeeHappee says:

    Bill, I read this and it made me wonder if your kids come over and pack up bags of goodies for themselves to take back. That is what we used to do with our parents and grandparents farms and homesteads. I remember studying at a university, living in a dorm, there was no such thing as pizza. 🙂 What we had, was potatoes. Go to your folks, bring back a huge sack of potatoes, carrots, beets, some smoked bacon and strawberry jam made by mom, and keep the sack under your dorm bed. 🙂 Pull some out, and fry some potato pancakes on a small dorm stove. The farms and gardens of the parents used to feed all the young until they had a place and food of their own. And then we would drive to my grandma’s with gallon sized glass bottles, she would run over to the cow for night milking, fill our jar with fresh milk, and we drive back, that jar of milk on my lap, splish splashing. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • bobraxton says:

      fun! right AFTER college graduation, I went with (future spouse) directly from rural NC to the big Apple (NYC) to live the first year in East Harlem. College mates got married after a month or so in Richmond, VA, to which we drove in the 1963 green VW bug with moon roof (sun roof). My parents had also driven up from NC and left us with a styrofoam (temp) cooler (think we still have) filled to the brim with tomatoes from the garden! joy of my life that time and forever after. We got married that September. My father died before their 46th anniversary – we already celebrated our 47th almost a year ago. Thanks for the verbal picture!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      I’m picturing those scenes and they make me smile. 🙂 My mother would mail me homemade biscuits during my first year in college. My sister used to take jugs of our well water with her to school because she couldn’t stand the taste of the city water there. Cherie sent our son care packages of corn bread.

      Liked by 1 person

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