Roads

There are severalย roads on our place.

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I like that, but they do require maintenance, usually at the time of year when we least have time to spare.

How to grow grass in the South? Put down gravel.

How to grow grass in the South? Put down gravel.

Of course, it grows without gravel as well.

Of course, it grows without gravel as well.

This one turns into a ditch after every heavy rain and must be regraded.

This one turns into a ditch after every heavy rain and must be regraded.

Sometimes this happens

Sometimes this happens

And this.

And this.

Still, it’s nice to be able to walk quiet roads.

Roads that are your own.

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32 comments on “Roads

  1. Sue says:

    Lovely lovely roads.
    Our gravel drive has the grass strip in the middle. Drives Hubby NUTS. I love it. It says “country”–which IMPLIES relaxed (but you guys know country living is seldom relaxed)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, country roads are indeed special. Mucky in the spring and dusty in the summer. Frankly, other than using for a path through the forest, I don’t miss them. Here in Nebraska seldom do we have a nice tree covered country road. It’s usually the road that we call a mile road. Every mile a country road goes north and south as well as east and west. So every square mile is surrounded by a gravel country road. These are used for farm machinery to get from field to field. There’s not many trees in farm country Nebraska so a country road wall is in full sun which can be hot and sweaty. It’s not totally bad though. The state bird is the Meadowlark which has a unique color and warble. A walk will certainly bring a Meadowlark warble to ears. Not many folks walk a country road here. Tractors are on the move during the Spring and Fall.

    There are havens of walking paths that have been preserved in my city. I happen to live by the Missouri river so bluffs provide trees and groomed walking paths. Parks, especially state parks, have provided walking paths through forested areas along the Platte river. I am a bit envious that you have your own private tree covered walking roads but then not so envious about the road maintenance. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Have a great walking roads day.

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    • Bill says:

      My to-do list includes taking care of the roads (filling potholes, regrading, etc.) but on busy summer days I usually just let it slide. A farm road should be a little bumpy I reckon. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  3. bobraxton says:

    roads scholar

    Liked by 1 person

  4. smcasson says:

    Seemed like half of everyone’s gravel was out on the highway after the recent storms here. They sent out snow plow trucks!
    I don’t have enough acreage for roads, but I have a path to the pond I like to walk. Relaxing.

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    • Bill says:

      We take long walks after supper almost every night. This time of year though the ticks usually prevent us from walking down the “pond road.” We save that one for winter.

      Like

  5. avwalters says:

    Around here, if you decide on a road, you’ll spend the rest of your days defending it from reverting to forest. We love our roads, both the leftover tracks from years ago logging, and the surprisingly well “maintained” paths kept by the deer.

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  6. BeeHappee says:

    Wow, that’s a lot of roads, Bill, I’d be confused which one to take. ๐Ÿ™‚ I do like that strip of grass in the middle, when you drive, it scrapes the bottom of the car, and that is the coolest sound.
    We rarely go off asphalt roads anymore around here, and when we seldomly do, kids get so excited about the bumps, dust, and adventure, they scream. Interesting, isn’t it, that we humans spend countless hours and laborers and billions of dollars paving roads, and then look for the first opportunity we get to go off-roading in the mud. ๐Ÿ™‚

    To get to my grandma’s place, which was surrounded by acres and acres of woods, we had to take couple miles of gravel road, then a mile of dirt road, and then last mile of narrow windy road through the woods, a road that was built by my dad and uncle. In wintertime, there was no such thing as plowing, so the car was parked, and last 2 miles were walked on foot.
    When you see your roads too overgrown, that is when you know you need more visitors to your farm. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Laurie@hinterlands.me says:

    Very beautiful!

    Like

  8. ain't for city gals says:

    If it were not for our desert roads….we call them trails…I would not be near as happy as I am.

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  9. gorgeous…that’s something that we’d trade our corner pub for in a heartbeat…

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    • Bill says:

      I’m trying to get better at seeing summertime nature in its wild unruly state without feeling an urge to try to tame it. We’re not worrying so much about mowing anymore. We’re trading one kind of beauty for another. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 2 people

  10. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    Call me a smart-arse, if you will… But, if you brought in some “A” gravel and put a crown on that ditch, then maybe you could call it a road… (But then again, with a pitch like that, I suppose that it’d still wash out, wouldn’t it?; )
    It must be nice. Looks like you’ve got more wood lot than call for firewood, hey?; ) What was that behemoth, anyway? Too bad it brought the wires along with it, when it came crashing down to earth):
    LOVE Bee’s comment about the sound of grass brushing as you pass; it reminds me of going out to the bee yard in the pickup with Dad (and John Denver: ) http://youtu.be/1vrEljMfXYo. Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      The key is to keep a good cutout at the top of the steep decline (down to a dam at our pond) to divert water into the ditches on the side of the road. It’s working pretty well now, but needs tending at times.

      That big oak has been dead a while and recently decided to lay down. Luckily there were no wires taken down. What you see is a cable we had stretched across the road to deter trespassers. That tree will heat our house for a long time this winter.

      Like

      • Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

        The trouble is – by waiting until it rotted enough to come down on its own – you’ve lost a massive amount of the heat that was (formerly) stored by the tree… Best practices for woodlot management would prescribe being taken down at the first signs of disease or over-crowding to take full advantage of the “power within”.
        “Waste not, want not.”… (Y’see, I did warn you it was a Smart-Arse comment; )

        Liked by 1 person

  11. EllaDee says:

    I love those roads where the corner turns just out of sight. When I see a road I see possibilities… where will they take me, what will the journey hold? We bought a lovely painting yesterday featuring a road for that very reason of appeal. But in real life because he builds road etc for a living I’m sure the G.O. also sees them from a work point of view.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      Your comment caused me to go back and look at the pictures again. What a beautiful observation and metaphor! I really like the image of roads as possibilities.

      Like

  12. barnraised says:

    Beautiful roads, beautiful land! That tree does look daunting though….

    Like

  13. Ann Wood says:

    Amen…and you know where they go even when blocked or overgrown…and oh, yes….they like the beautiful fields are yours….happy trails to you, Bill!

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Thanks Ann. I’m satisfied to let them be a little more wild and feral than I used to be. It’s good to walk as lightly on them as we can I think. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

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