Pig Water

I try to make sure the pigs have fresh clean water to drink. But I think it matters more to me than it does to them.

When I give them clean water, it doesn’t stay clean long. Despite having wallows, the pigs can’t resist getting over into the tub, transforming their fresh water into muddy water almost immediately.

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This morning I cleaned and refilled their tub while the pigs were having breakfast.

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But at looking at their muddy rear ends, I knew it wouldn’t last long.

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I was right.

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18 comments on “Pig Water

  1. BeeHappee says:

    I like that rear end picture! My kids like to hang out with the pigs at a farm, we pour in milk and grains for them, and within seconds milk is turned into mud, and they happily gobble it up. Sometimes it is so good to turn into a pig and not worry so much.

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  2. smcasson says:

    It’s the same way with our ducks, though not as large a scale, and not as quick. It wouldn’t be so bad if I didn’t have to hump water out there in buckets. Your case, buckets wouldn’t be an option. Love the happy piggies.

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    • Bill says:

      Luckily we have a spigot at the shed and I can run a hose to their water trough and wallows. But I do know people who haul water to their pigs daily. Glad I don’t have to do that. They go through a lot more water than your ducks probably do. 🙂

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  3. Sue says:

    LOL!
    Anything for happy animals.
    🙂

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  4. shoreacres says:

    Here’s a city girl question: do all breeds of pigs have curled tails? Does anyone know (or has anyone hypothesized) why they’re curled? They’re one of the few animals that are cute at both ends!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sue says:

      I’ve often read that you can tell the health of a pig by it’s curly tail. Not curly–not happy/healthy.
      I’m thinking that must be right and that Bill has some pretty happy pigs
      🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      On factory farms the pigs’ tails are docked (clipped off short). In close confinement they will bite each others tails. Here I’ve never seen a pig bite another pig’s tail, so they keep to keep their gloriously handsome tails. 🙂

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  5. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, oh, yeah, more piggy shots. Pigs are, well, pigs. They just can’t help themselves. We had the self watering pig watering bowls which was a bowl with a valve that could be pushed with the pig snout to get water to drink. Even with that the pigs would some how get the bowls filled with mud. So twice a day we had to clean them out. Some times the best thought out technology doesn’t circumvent the instinct of the animal. We found that most times it’s just best to let the animals be who they are as much as we could. To me confinement for a pig would be the ultimate torture. They love their freedom. During my time of raising pigs, some would put rings in their noses to keep them from rooting in the dirt. Pigs were born to root in the dirt.

    I really like to see the happy faces on your pigs. Mine were the same way as they scoured the small pasture area Dad had set aside for them. The picture of the rear ends flashed a thought through my mind. “Now there are some happy hams.” 🙂

    Have a great pig raising day.

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    • Bill says:

      A friend who reads the blog regularly (and raises pigs naturally) sent me a link to site offering those kinds of waterers after he read this post. There is an automatic waterer in their pasture, but it was designed for cattle. The clever pigs eventually figure it out and they do muddy the water even with that. I may invest in an automatic waterer for them someday, but for now I’ll just let them have their muddy water. They seem to enjoy it. 🙂

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  6. Laurie@hinterlands.me says:

    I have to say, those pig rear-ends are pretty darned cute. Bathe on, pigs!

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  7. Pigs will be pigs… ❤
    Diana xo

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