Weeding and the Goose

It’s impossible to stay ahead of the grass and weeds this time of year. Nature is in overdrive.  I spent a lot of time with my weedeater yesterday.  Like a chainsaw, I consider a weedeater a necessary evil on the farm. The weeds beneath the grapevines had grown to be taller than the vines themselves.  The situation called for drastic action.

I also spent time rescuing the zucchini, which was in danger of being overrun. But that weeding was all done by hand.  We’ll see how long it takes the weeds to regroup and return.

After battling back the weeds

After battling back the weeds

Grateful zuke

Grateful zuke

We’re harvesting an abundance of squash and zucchini these days, and enjoying meals featuring fresh squash (one of my personal favorites). We’re in the midst of transitioning to summer crops now and should have tomatoes, eggplant, green beans, potatoes and peppers very soon.  What a great time of year.

IMG_7226

Baby banana fingerling potatoes

We’re looking forward to returning the Wild Goose Festival, which is next weekend in Hot Springs, North Carolina. We’ll be giving a talk on Sunday morning and we spent part of yesterday preparing for it.

The theme of this year’s event is “Blessed are the Peacemakers.”  Our talk is titled “Peacemaking through Sustainable Living.” Here’s the blurb describing it on the website:

Talk – Peacemaking through Sustainable Living
A society that consumes more than it produces will ultimately collapse. Along the way, in order to survive, such a society will have to beg, borrow or steal from others. Violence and exploitation are inherent byproducts of overconsumption and unsustainable living.

Bill and Cherie Guerrant are farmers and advocates for lives of voluntary simplicity. They will discuss their ongoing journey to sustainable living, and how we can all help create a culture that lives peacefully and in harmony with the rest of creation, through simple living and ethical eating.

More about us and our talk HERE.

We’re looking forward to connecting again with our old Wild Goose friends, and to making new ones.

For the past few years this has been our only weekend away from the farm.  We have farm sitters lined up, so we’ll be swapping farm chores for a few nights in a tent in the woods by a river and a few days soaking up music, justice, spirituality and art.

For any readers planning to attend, we hope you’ll say hello if you see us.

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20 comments on “Weeding and the Goose

  1. farmerkhaiti says:

    Have a great time on that getaway Bill!!! Lucky you to have farm chore swappers!

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    • Bill says:

      Thanks Khaiti. We’re looking forward to it. But I don’t have to tell you how hard it is to leave the farm, especially in the summer. I’ll have a lot of catching up to do when we return!

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  2. Wish we could be there, would love to meet you two and it sounds like a great time.

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  3. bobraxton says:

    enjoy

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  4. BeeHappee says:

    Sounds like fun!! You guys deserved it.

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  5. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, Peacemakers, huh. So, I gather the theme is that those that grow food for an over consuming society will ultimately keep hungry people fed and violence at a minimum? My city keeps begging for anyone to cultivate vacant lots. They have an abundance of lots that could be used to grow food and really no one is interested in producing a harvest on them. I blame it on ease of obtaining government assistance and just plain being lazy. When the almighty dollar withers and becomes devalued beyond repair, ciaos will result. The issue becomes then if I was growing food and thugs come to take it, would I break out the gun and protect it or would I share it. I would hope and pray that I would share and depend on God for enough to sustain my life and family. There is a time coming when food and drinking water will be precious commodities.

    You talk about zucchini and tomatoes. I’m just now thinking about planting zucchini. It would be a late harvest but I’ve found that it foils the vine borer which almost always destroying any vine plant here. I am harvesting cherry tomatoes from the buckets that started in my basement. The regular tomatoes are growing bigger but haven’t started turning red just yet. I planted six more tomatoes yesterday only to find three of them dug up and eaten. I’m thinking that must be the ground hog. Deer wouldn’t dig up a plant and eat it roots and all. These tomato plants are the ones that were the back up plan if a disaster hit. Ha, I ended up with 26 tomato plants and still a few left to plant. Luckily I have a lady I met that over heard a conversation about gardening at Mc Donald’s that wants to process tomatoes. We struck a deal that I would grow them, she would can them, and I get a share of the processes tomatoes. Works for me. 🙂

    Have a great wild goose festival talk planning day.

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    • Bill says:

      We’re advocating living more peaceful lives by becoming less dependent and by consuming less. That in turn will lead to a more peaceful society as it lessens the competition for resources and conflict due to scarcity. We’ll probably talk about the violence that our overconsumptive ways generates. Hopefully it will be videotaped and if so I’ll share the link when its available.

      Tomatoes are a real sore subject for me right now. Everything else is doing great, but deer have ruined the tomatoes. Why did it have to be the tomatoes??

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  6. rhondajean says:

    That sounds like a wonderful talk, Bill, and being a wild goose myself, I’d love to hear it. I’m sure you and Cherie will have a wonderful time there with like-minded folk.

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    • Bill says:

      Thanks Rhonda. We’ve enjoyed the getaway the last few years. I hope the talk will be well-received. It’s certainly a subject we’re passionate about. I’m not sure if the sessions will be recorded and posted on line this year, but if ours is I’ll share it here someday.

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  7. shoreacres says:

    Everyone needs time away, especially time that’s nourishing and sustaining.It’s interesting to think about how we’re trained to consume particular kinds of leisure, too. I have no objection to people going to Disneyworld or Vegas to “relax,” but your time away sounds ever so much better. Have fun!

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    • Bill says:

      Great point Linda. I used to be one who rushed around on vacation, “consuming” leisure. I try to not be that way anymore. Even the first time we went to this festival I wanted to see a speaker or artist during every slot over the entire 3 days. Now we spend a lot of time sitting at the campsite talking to friends. We don’t try to consume every thing offered. Much better that way.

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  8. EllaDee says:

    If we are happy with who we are, where we are, what we have, and don’t wish to deny others the same or covet what they have… then that’s peace. I’m all for it.

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    • Bill says:

      Well said. Peacemaking isn’t limited to mediating conflict. It begins with living a peaceful life. That’s going to be the focus of our talk.

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  9. Joanna says:

    I don’t do enough weeding and it shows. Yesterday I managed to walk to the post office and do some shopping, finish off some academic work, talk to my daughter and granddaughter on Skype and that left me about three hours to do some weeding. It was a slow job with minuscule beetroot seedlings peeping through amongst the weeds and goodness only knows where the carrots went to – I think I saw three. Too cold, too dry, eaten? Who knows

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    • Bill says:

      I managed to keep the beets relatively safe from weeds this year. When we had our Tanzanian visitors they insisted on doing some farm chores, so they helped me weed beets one day. But carrots? I quit trying to grow them a couple of years ago. They germinate so slowly and are so delicate that it was a nightmare trying to keep them weeded. And I rarely got decently sized carrots in the end. As a carrot grower, I’m a failure.

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      • smcasson says:

        Glad to hear someone else is!! Their slow germination makes it very difficult. And I don’t think they’re supposed to be transplanted? A trick I used successfully this year was to interplant radishes with carrots. Radishes come out of the ground and leave looser soil for carrots, and serve as a marker for the row. Harvested a good few carrots this weekend too! Bonus!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joanna says:

        If we can get them to germinate, they do fine here, but yes they are slow. I am wondering about sowing some just before winter, it worked for some parsnips

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