Tanzanian Visitors

Thanks to Cherie’s efforts, our farm stay is now open and available (details HERE and HERE). Almost immediately after listing it on farm stay websites we had our first reservation.

This weekend we had our first guests: a Tanzanian farmer, a Tanzanian farm advisor and their American guide, a former Peace Corps volunteer who met them during her time in Tanzania.

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Our new Tanzanian friends were here to learn about sustainable chemical-free agriculture.  It was delight to exchange ideas and knowledge with them.

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They insisted on doing some farm work while they were here, so I gratefully allowed them to help me weed the beets and lettuce and lay drip tape.

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We loved sharing the message and having the opportunity to teach and learn from colleagues on the other side of the world who share our values and goals.

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29 comments on “Tanzanian Visitors

  1. What a wonderful experience, Bill! Exchanging knowledge is a terrific way to foster goodwill. And now you have new friends in Tanzania. 🙂
    How long did they stay with you?

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    • Bill says:

      I so agree Jackie. Cross cultural communication breaks down lots of problems and barriers.
      They were only here for a day and a night. They were moving on to visit other farms and agricultural sites in South Carolina. It was their first trip ever out of their country and they’re spending it on farms. I love that.

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  2. BeeHappee says:

    You guys are amazing.

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    • Bill says:

      Not us. It was our guests who were amazing. The farmer raises his crops on steep land, at high elevation and without the benefit of electricity. The young woman (the Tanzanian equivalent of an American extension agent) is dedicated to helping implement sustainable practices (against the pressure to follow chemically-intensive practices. The American woman was a Peace Corp volunteer in the farmer’s village. They were an inspirational lot.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    Yup, cross-cultural, inter-continental, sharing at its best… This is definitely an AWEsome way to make a difference in the world; congratulations to all of you!

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    • Bill says:

      We imagine most of our guests will be city folks looking to escape for some peace and quiet. It was a thrill to be able to host fellow farmers, especially given their interest in sustainability. We learned from each other and I sent them off with some seeds that hopefully will be producing crops there later this year.

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  4. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, sounds like you are off to a good start with the “Farm Stay” program. Growing food is a great thing to have in common. I bet it was interesting to hear about how they grow things in Tanzania. It would definitely be strange to have opposite seasons than what I’m used to having. I suppose it’s odd for them to see Spring here when it’s closing down on Winter where they live. Although I see the temperatures there are middle 80s for today and yes, rain. Rain must be a world wide thing …. well …. except for Virginia. 🙂

    My back yard raised beds dried out enough to plant a second crop of beans. Next on the list is cucumbers at Terra Nova Gardens and Urban Ranch (where I live). I have two more weeks of unhampered garden time. When Bradley comes, my garden time will be about 2 1/2 hours in the early morning (5:30am). He absolutely hates gardening. It takes too long to see any thing happen. Early morning gardening during hot summer months is the best anyway. It’s cool, quiet, and more enjoyable than later in the day. Later in the day is reserved for grass mowing after the dew is off. Just like there’s a season for everything, there’s a time for every thing as well.

    Have a great Farm Stay day. May your income and education opportunities increase greatly from Farm Stay.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      The Tanzanian farmer (his name in Swahili was unprounceable by me) grows potatoes as his cash crop. He also grows a lot of tomatoes and of course food for the village. It was very interesting learning about their practices and they seemed very interested in ours.

      We’ve had less than an inch of rain this entire month. None of the crops I planted from seed have even come up yet. I’ve been putting down our new drip irrigation system to try to save the seedlings, but no matter what happens we’ll be delayed significantly in our summer crops. But that’s just the way it goes. Our spring gardens have done very well.

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  5. dilipnaidu says:

    Congratulations and wish you enjoyable farming. As they say the best fertilizer is the footprints of the farmer.

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  6. bobraxton says:

    for those visiting: Karibuni (sana) – Habari ya Asibuhi (although it is not still morning)

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    • Bill says:

      I learned a few words of Swahili during their stay (promptly forgotten). It was an interesting group–he a Muslim, the young woman (Bernadetthe) a Catholic and their American guide a Quaker. Berndatthe spoke English and served as an interpreter for the man (whose name I couldn’t pronounce).

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  7. barnraised says:

    This is so neat. Wow. It’s wonderful that you are opening your farm up to others!

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    • Bill says:

      We love having visitors, especially if they’re genuinely interested in our practices. So we loved having these folks. Last year we had some visitors from the Ukraine who were also small farmers and deeply interested in what we are doing. I hope we’ll continue to get visitors like that.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Fun to share your place with others. Thanks for sharing it with us.

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  9. rhondajean says:

    Testing to see if THIS one gets through. :- )

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  10. rhondajean says:

    Success!

    Bill, I just wanted to say that I think you’re lucid, beautiful and wise. Your farm stay looks like it would offer a lot of interest. If I were closer, I’d be there with my husband quick smart. Your guests look like they’re having a great time. It’s a blessing for you and them.

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    • Bill says:

      Thanks Rhonda. I appreciate the kind words. We’d be thrilled to have y’all visit. I think we’re about as far away from each other as possible without leaving the planet, but should you ever be in our part of the world we’d love to have you over. 🙂

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  11. avwalters says:

    Very cool. Sustainable, across oceans, via friendships….

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  12. That is fantastic! A farm stay with an educational component. We hope to make that a focus for our farm stays – but that is quite a ways off for us. I’m so happy your first farm stay was such a success.

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    • Bill says:

      We offer farm tours by request. I was really pleased that our first paying guests were here for educational reasons, but I expect most folks who come will just be looking for a quiet getaway from the rat race. Either way is fine by us. 🙂

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  13. FeyGirl says:

    What a wonderful concept — not only the educational factor, but the cross-cultural / international sharing, learning the best practices globally, component!

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    • Bill says:

      The farmer took copious notes the whole time. I felt a little awkward as he’s almost certainly a far better farmer than us. But hopefully he came away with some things he can use. I sent him off with lots of seeds too. They helped me too. Taught me a new way to identify when a goat has intestinal parasites, among other things. It was fun having them here. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Laura says:

    What a great idea and how fun to meet people from around the world. Can’t wait to hear about your future interactions.

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    • Bill says:

      I’d be delighted if we have more international farmer visitors. Whether we do or not, I’m sure we’ll meet more interesting people.

      Like

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