Gardening Geek

On his Portraits of Wildflowers blog, Steven Schwartzman recently shared a quote describing a plant as one that “catches the eye and triggers the lust gene in plant geeks and adventurous gardeners.”  I chuckled when I read it. I suppose I qualify as a “plant geek and adventurous gardener.” And I know many who read this blog do as well (I know this because I read your blogs).

So for all my fellow gardening geeks, here’s a list of what we have growing now:

  • 3 varieties of muskmelon
  • collard greens
  • 3 varieties of kale
  • broccoli
  • 2 varieties of cabbage
  • asparagus
  • 5 varieties of tomatoes
  • 2 varieties of eggplant
  • bell peppers
  • 2 varieties of cucumbers
  • zucchini
  • 3 varieties of summer squash
  • Tokyo Bekana
  • a baby lettuce mix
  • 4 types of salanova lettuce
  • green romaine lettuce
  • bok choy
  • senposai
  • Chinese cabbage
  • mizuna
  • komatsuna
  • tatsoi
  • Yukina savoy
  • 2 varieties of fingerling potatoes
  • 3 varieties of Irish potatoes
  • garlic
  • 2 varieties of onions
  • radishes
  • turnips
  • turnip greens
  • 3 varieties of beets
  • Swiss chard
  • English peas
  • 2 varieties of watermelon
  • okra
  • sweet corn
  • acorn squash
  • delicata squash
  • spaghetti squash
  • butternut squash
  • cannelloni beans
  • black beans
  • green beans

That list doesn’t include the many plants we have growing in pots as experiments or because we only needed a few.  It also doesn’t include the long list of herbs Cherie grows.

I’ll be planting 2 types of hot peppers later this week.  In a couple of weeks we’ll also put in sweet potatoes and purple hull peas.

Our spinach and snap peas were fails this year.

We do staggered plantings of green beans and melons, so we’ll be planting more of them later this year. We’ll also plant a June garden for late tomatoes and squash, adding some new varieties.  Then in late August we’ll plant fall gardens.

I’m confident that list qualifies me as a gardening geek.

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27 comments on “Gardening Geek

  1. DM says:

    that is amazing. Takes lots of management skills.

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    • Bill says:

      I spent most of this week planting. The only management skill I employed was the executive decision to neglect everything else on the farm until I was finished. 🙂

      But it is a challenge to keep ahead of the weeds, while still finding time to harvest.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. daphnegould says:

    Another blogger I read planted Tokyo Bekana this year too. Looking at photos of it reminds me of Fun Jen. I used to grow it, but quit because it just doesn’t cook up well. It is great for eating raw, but when a green really comes in and overwhelms you, I want something I can cook. You can eat a lot more of a cooked green than you can in a salad. Does Tokyo Bekana cook well?

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    • Bill says:

      It’s delicious cooked. We just had some for supper tonight. We do also enjoy it raw as an alternative to lettuce. It’s one of our favorites.

      By the way, your blog was one of the ones that inspired me to post this. I love that you track production and the value of what you grow, and share it on your blog. Here’s another blog I enjoy that also does that. http://www.overallgardener.com/

      Like

  3. Joanna says:

    If I remember I might try to compile a similar list for this week’s blog. I bet your record keeping is better than mine. I do tend to be haphazard at times. Ian on the other hand is much more meticulous than I am, but he doesn’t usually do the seed planting 😀

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    • Bill says:

      I hope you do, as I enjoy seeing what other gardeners are growing. As for record keeping, mine is pretty primitive. I keep a list of gardens and what’s planted where so I can plan rotation. But that’s about it.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. shoreacres says:

    Your list brought to mind an interesting thought. I’ve never had fresh black beans: only dried. I’ve had fresh black-eyed peas, Lady cream peas, limas, azuki — but never black. Clearly, all those dried black beans started out fresh. I’ll have to see if I can find them this year.

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    • Bill says:

      Actually I’m not sure they’re good fresh. We let them dry on the vines. I seem to recall looking into whether they can be eaten fresh and finding out that they should only be eaten dry. I’m not sure why and that doesn’t seem right to me, but that’s my recollection. Even on the seed package it gives days to maturity fresh and dry for the white beans, but only dry for the black beans.

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  5. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, ah, yes, I think you qualify for the gardener geek award. I did get some green beans planted yesterday before the rains set in again. It rained all night so no gardening today. More rain for today will hamper the garden work for sure. There’s a 60% to 80% chance of rain all the way through Saturday. The plants are residing outside all the time now unless a severe storm threat comes through and will be planted over the course of the next two weeks. Wisdom has told me to hold back on the planting even though many here have green beans, corn, and tomatoes in the ground and growing. I wish them all luck but I am hesitant to plant it all just yet.

    Yes, weeds abound here too. I have been able to some what stay ahead of the grass and weeds but it’s getting dangerously close to being out of control. I have a couple of other people’s projects to sprinkle in with the gardening. There’s two concrete stair repairs, one electrical issue to look at, and a tree to trim. Each day in life is an adventure and that’s the way I like it.

    Have a great gardening geek planting day and I’ll try my best to send you some rain.

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    • Bill says:

      I’m conservative on planting dates too. I’m not trying to have the first tomato at the market. I’d rather wait until the soil conditions are optimal and the risks are minimal. I finally finished the summer planting today. I’m sorry that you’re having so much rain. Wish you could send some our way. It’s as dry as a bone and I’m having to irrigate already.

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  6. Cynthia says:

    That list is sure something! Gardening Geek Extraordinaire:). Sounds great and very exciting.

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  7. avwalters says:

    You left gardening geek in the dust, long ago. I’m a gardening geek. You’re a farmer.

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    • Bill says:

      I consider myself a farmer, but there are plenty of farmers who would say I’m a gardener. That’s fine by me too. 🙂

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      • avwalters says:

        I’m a gardener. I think the difference comes when you must make hard decisions base on what will sell. I note that there are things you grow only for yourselves–and then the things that you have for market. I still have difficulties culling the extras! Yes, I’m planting 21 tomato plants, but that’s because we can (pun intended.)

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      • Bill says:

        We don’t grow anything we don’t like. Thus, no butterbeans (even though they sell easily). And we grow things we like, even if they sell poorly (like Asian greens). We’re basically homesteaders who sell our surplus. Because I’m a gardening geek, we have a lot of surplus. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Doesn’t get much more Geeky, Bill. I am sure of that. 🙂 Collard greens, BTW, are my favorite for the Liberian chop (food) I make. –Curt

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  9. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    Oh boy Bill, when you said that Oriental greens were catching on, you really weren’t kidding, were you?! So, would you mind telling me, do you buy all of your seed from one house, or many? (Just to make easier my attempt to look up those with which I’m unfamiliar; ). This is an awe-inspiring list… Thanks for sharing! Oh, and (how I wish I had but…): I haven’t had time to comment these past few days, but I would definitely tag you “Farmer” as well; )
    And Agri-Business is NOT farming…

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    • Bill says:

      We use several seed companies. Most of our seeds come from Johnny’s, Fedco and Southern Exposure. We get some of our Asian greens seeds from Kitazawa Seed Company and we also get some seeds from Baker’s Creek.

      I appreciate your comment about farming. Our community is considering trying to attract a poultry processing factory, which would mean about 500 new “poultry houses” as well. Some are saying that this will help farmers. But I wonder how we can call something “farming” if it is done entirely indoors. And is it farming when the farmer doesn’t own the animals and has no say in what they’re fed?

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      • Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

        Yeah, well… Sounds more like a Custodian to me – but, back to that “Agri-Business” thing, right?):

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  10. You are growing an entire green grocer. Awesome. Would love to see some shots of all your veggies.
    Have a happy weekend Bill.
    🙂 Mandy xo

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  11. hamertheframer says:

    That’s an impressive list! Many seem exotic to English eyes so it reads like a poem. Collard greens is my favourite though I never tasted it.

    Like

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