A Curiosity

There isn’t much traffic on our road–only a few vehicles a day.

But lately I’ve noticed that those few vehicles tend to slow down when they pass by.  They’re slowing down to have a look at the curious sight in our pasture.

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Deer usually stay hidden during the day and come out to forage for food at night.  Goats do the opposite–eating during the day and bedding down in a safe place at night.

But this deer has now taken up with the goats and has adopted their schedule. So if you drive by our farm these days you’re likely to see a deer grazing in the pasture with our goats.

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You don’t see that everyday.  It’s worth slowing down to have a closer look.

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32 comments on “A Curiosity

  1. Joanna says:

    We have a similar problem. We are the only alpaca owners in Latvia where you can see them from the road. Most are in more out of the way places, where you would drive to go and see them. Ian has also been taking the younger two ladies out for a walk to get them used to the harness and people walking them and he has noticed a few rather surprised faces and lots of cars slow down

    Liked by 1 person

  2. shoreacres says:

    It’s always fun to see something new along the road, especially something that makes us do a double-take and think, “Did I really see that?” It’s also interesting that those momentary sights often remain in our memories, like photographs. I was driving a gravel road in Kansas when a hawk flew in front of the car, just higher than the car’s roof. It was carrying a snake by the head, and about four feet of snake was dangling down. It was there, and then it was gone. But I still can see it.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Bill, I’ve only seen one other time that a deer was tamed. When I was just a lad of early twenties and courting my first wife, she had a friend of the family that lived on a farm and had found a fawn that was basically just born in the woods near the farm house. The mother probably had been killed or died after birth. After nursing it through the early weeks and months of life, it became a pet and wandered around the yard with the dogs. They tried their best to keep it locked up during deer hunting season but the wild instinct was too much and it escaped the confines of the barn never to be seen again. It was a full grown two year old when it escaped so some hunter had an easy shot, I suspect. It is interesting how wild and domestic some times cross paths in a good way. I’m surprised that he/she has hung around this long. The wild call is strong and most deer especially will not stick around as long as this one has. Maybe it’s a special deer sent just for you to enjoy.

    Have a great garden planting and deer watching day.

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    • Bill says:

      The deer in our pasture is not tame. She just likes hanging out with goats. When I enter the pasture the goats run toward me and the deer runs away.

      Here it is illegal to tame or domesticate wildlife. Any wildlife kept that way is killed (I have no idea why). If this deer were tame (especially in plain sight like that) a game warden would come and kill her.

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      • Hmmm, really? My deer story was from Missouri and was 40 some years ago. I think there are similar laws in Nebraska about domesticating wild animals but I don’t think they kill them if they find them. Here they put them in a Parks and Recreation reserve if they can’t be re introduced to the wild.

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      • Bill says:

        Crazy isn’t it? Happened to two people we know here. Makes no sense to me.

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  4. BeeHappee says:

    I would slow down too, Bill, even if there was no deer. 🙂 We watched Touching the Wild last night, about Joe Hutto living with buck deer, but it took him 2 good years, being out there day in and day out to have the deer come close to him. And you have the deer living with goats. Way too precious. When I was a kid, I was a surrogate mom for chickens often. One year, just after chicks hatched, mother hen got killed in an accident wedging herself in beet cutter blade, so grandma told me to watch the chickens so hawks and crows don’t get them. Well, those chickens followed me for months, everywhere.

    Joanna, how cool, I did not know you had alpaca farm in Latvia!! If my plans to be in Lithuania this year come through, we will stop by your farm to visit!!! 🙂 I was thinking of taking kids to alpaca farm this weekend if weather and sicknesses clear up.

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    • Bill says:

      I’m regularly followed around by goats, pigs and chickens. I don’t expect the deer to start doing that (and I don’t intend to encourage her). 🙂

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  5. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    If they’re all grazing right out by the road, no wonder people are slowing down for a look!
    Maybe she’ll just hang out with the gang until the hormones kick in? I’m guessing there must be lots of deer in that bush up the hill in behind. Meanwhile, let’s just hope she doesn’t become too tame; like Dave said… ):

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    • Bill says:

      There is an army of deer living on this place. Why this one has chosen to take up with the goats is a mystery to me. My best guess is that she was orphaned during hunting season, perhaps after her mother had parked her in the pasture. When mom never returned, she fell in with the goats. But maybe, as one of my neighbors says, she thinks she’s a goat.

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  6. avwalters says:

    Dear are pretty common here. We have a small herd that walks right by us every evening–7-20 of them, depending on the day. When I was in Two Rock, though, one day the emus got out. That really slowed down traffic!

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  7. EllaDee says:

    Something that slows and distracts people from hurry hurry is a fine thing 🙂

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  8. Seeking Joyful Simplicity says:

    That’s really neat! I wonder how long it will stick around? Deer mating season is in the fall, is that right?

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  9. barnraised says:

    Oh yes it is worth slowing down for that sight!!

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  10. Wait till they start sleeping on your porch, Bill. I am blogging about that today. 🙂 —Curt

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  11. How neat. Cute photo at the end. Seems they’ve stopped to check out you!

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  12. Worth slowing down, indeed! Does the deer get close to you? I wonder how long she’ll come around.

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    • Bill says:

      When the goats see me they come running. She’ll run along with them until she sees me, then she turns and dashes for the woods. She fears humans, which is a good thing for her. As for how long she’s going to stay, I don’t know. My guess is that she’ll prefer the company of deer once mating season begins.

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  13. Bet the other deer judge her….

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