Drinking Water

Sunday was World Water Day, a day devoted to bringing awareness to the importance of clean drinking water–a precious commodity, taken for granted by many of us and desperately needed by many others.

Blood:Water Mission is a great organization, which we like to support.  They urged people to drink only water on Sunday, and to contribute their savings to help bring clean water to people who don’t have it.  A very worthy cause.

But that fundraising strategy wouldn’t be very effective if everyone drank the way we do.  Water is always our beverage of choice.  Neither of us drink soft drinks. Cherie doesn’t drink milk and other than a little in my morning coffee, neither do I.  We always drink water, and only water, at our meals.

I do have a cup of coffee in the morning and Cherie has tea.  Sometimes I’ll drink ice tea in the afternoon.  But most days I just drink water.

We host a monthly gathering of people interested in sustainable living and water is the only beverage we serve.  The last time we hosted Thanksgiving for the extended family we made the mistake of letting my mother know that we would be serving water with the meal.  So folks showed up with coolers full of Pepsi, Dr. Pepper and Mt. Dew.  The prospect of a meal without a sugary drink was evidently unbearable.

Water is refreshing, healthy and free.

Here every day is Water Day.

Advertisements

29 comments on “Drinking Water

  1. shoreacres says:

    From time to time, I’ll have a nice diet Dr. Pepper or Coke while traveling, but Dr. Peppter with dinner? Hmmmm… That doesn’t appeal so much. With a burger, sure. But not with most meals. Now, a nice Pinot Grigiot with dinner? That’s a different matter. 🙂

    I was focused on water in a different way this weekend. We got inches of rain on Saturday, and I spent most of the day catching and storing rainwater for my plants. They aren’t fond of the chloramines in the city tap water, and the stuff kills my African violets. So, rain water it is. I’ve got a good three months’ worth bottled up and ready to use, so even a temporary drought won’t be a problem — at least on my balcony.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Sounds like a smart move. We’ve had about all the rainwater we can stand lately. Our ground is still muddy with more rain forecast for tomorrow. I wish we could send some of it out west.

      Like

  2. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, Water is a subject that is probably even bigger than food. Just ask California. Without water, there is no food. The battle over river water rights is a very real thing in the southwest area of our country. Water is even indirectly used to run our cars by fracking the oil out of the ground. I’m not a big fan of that use but we are an oil energy hungry nation. I have started drinking more water but I’m not sure that it’s much better that other drinks in my city. A notice came out some years ago from the water company says they had made some changes in the chemicals used in the water to make the quality better and safer but the alert was not to put it in a fish tank as it would kill the fish. WHAT? Safe! Better quality?

    When water first hit the store shelf, I thought that was the dumbest thing ever. Who would ever buy water when it come free right out of the ground or tap in the urban house. Little did I know what was to happen to water for the sake of safe and better quality. Today urban health conscious workers pay the same or more for a gallon of water as they do for a gallon of fuel for their car. Who would have thought? Water, in my humble opinion, will be the precious commodity in the future. Without it, we die in about three to four days. Without food, we die in a little more than 60 days.

    Have a great quality water drinking day.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Oh brother. Don’t even get me started on the bottled water thing. I’ve blogged about it many times (here’s an example: https://practicingresurrection.wordpress.com/2009/02/14/bottled-water/). The bottled water industry is proof of many things, including how easily consumers can be manipulated into foolish purchases, how insane our consumer economy can be, how wasteful and shortsighted we are as a society, etc.

      And I think you’re right about water. It is already beginning to drive conflict around the world and that will probably only get worse.

      Like

      • nebraskadave says:

        Interesting post about bottled water for sure. It’s true about the quality of bottled water. The law here in Nebraska states that it has to meet the same quality as tap water so essentially the water companies could indeed just fill the bottles with ordinary old tap water and sell it. It has indeed been a marketing ploy that has duped the country into buying water could be no better than what comes from their kitchen faucet. 😦

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Water water everywhere just now – pouring with rain. We’re blessed up here in the PNW with abundance in that regard. But it’s a precious resource elsewhere. As Dave says, just look at California. There’s a lot that needs to change about how we farm, where we farm, and how we manage water. But you’re right. Bottled water has to be one of the craziest ideas ever. Makes me think of pet rocks. The plastic waste, the water itself and where it comes from and who it deprives – it’s sheer wanton greed. I haven’t bought bottled water in years. We travel with our metal water bottles and tour guides will tell us if local water is safe for tourist tummies or not. If it’s not, we buy a big 5 litre jug of water, like the locals do, and fill our daily bottles from that. Water isn’t safe to drink everywhere, but in most parts of North America it is, and we are surely the biggest spenders on bottled water, which makes no sense. Also, when you think about it, carrying a water bottle around during the day is a relatively new phenomenon – maybe dating back to the 80’s? I don’t know that we were unduly dehydrated before that as a result either. Makes you think there was some brilliant marketing going on around the health movement back then.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Amen. You nailed it. See my response to Dave.
      The bottled water phenomenon is evidence of how crazy we can be. I used to rant about it a lot on this blog.
      There is a hilarious Penn and Teller skit about the bottled water scam. In case you haven’t seen it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P08FvYV1q2U
      By the way, I’m reading Mark Shepard’s Restoration Agriculture and really enjoying it. I can’t remember who recommended it to me, but it might have been you. If so, thanks!

      Liked by 2 people

  4. avwalters says:

    No sodas for us. Mostly water–though coffee is a must in the morning. After a hard day of construction or gardening (especially if its hot) we’re good for a beer. On cold winter nights, it’s nice to have the occasional toddy–hot lemonade with honey and sometimes a drab of whiskey. Otherwise its water.Serve it cold in summer, hot in winter, water is good for whatever ails you.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      I realize now there is a serious flaw in my post, as I forgot about our nightly wine or tea. Usually we’ll have a couple of glasses of wine before bedtime. But lately we’ve been having hot tea instead. I rarely drink beer any more. I think every human body is allowed a certain amount of beer in a lifetime, and I used all mine up when I was in college.

      Liked by 1 person

      • avwalters says:

        Well, my husband doesn’t think what I drink is beer. I can’t do gluten–so it’s sorghum beer. I was mostly underage for college, so I didn’t get my beer quota. Wine’s okay if no sulphites. Evening tea is nice, if no caffeine. I tell ya, the cumulative part of getting older is a pain.

        Liked by 2 people

  5. We have our own well with delicious cold water. Now If I could take care of the calcium problem… 🙂 –Curt

    Like

  6. Joanna says:

    I would struggle with just water, except when its very hot, in which case I drink a lot, as you can guarantee it will be the week we are putting up hay. I do drink tea though, not like the English do with milk, but just weak and black and hot! The thought of sugary soda at a meal table makes me shudder, but even that is better than the diet stuff with the chemical sweetners. Bleh!

    Like

    • Bill says:

      We rarely drink anything other than water at meals. But we are both tea lovers. Ice tea in the daytime and hot tea at night. And I begin every morning with a cup of coffee.

      Like

      • Joanna says:

        I remember the first time I was confronted with tea. It was my first visit to the US and I was perplexed as to why someone should ask me if I wanted sweet or unsweet tea. When it came in a big glass with ice, I was completely dumbfounded. Tea was supposed to come in cups and be hot. I learnt then to ask for hot tea whenever I was in America. After living in the US for a year, I returned home to the UK for a visit and asked for hot tea, you should have seen the look on the waitresses incredulous face, it kind of said “and how else do you expect your tea?”

        Like

      • Bill says:

        I had a similar experience when I asked for iced tea in Australia. 🙂

        I’m one of those rare Southerners who didn’t grow up drinking sweet tea. I started drinking tea as an adult, living in Florida, and I always drank it unsweet. I remember the first time I asked for unsweet tea when I was back here. The girl taking my order gave me a puzzled look and said, “You want your tea unsweet?” It was clear that it had never occurred to her that one could drink tea without sugar in it.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. EllaDee says:

    We have a soda stream and make DIY fizzy water from boiled filtered city tap water, and an old-fashioned soda syphon in the country and make DIY fizzy water straight from the rainwater tank. We drink black coffee, tea, wine that we mix half half with that fizzy water and just plain old water. No juice, and other than the G.O.’s treat of small glass bottles of coke, no soft drink.
    We feel privileged to have those rainwater tanks. My MiL who lives in town pays over $800 per year for water connection and usage. Not that she drinks it, other than in tea and cordial mix, most of it goes on her flower gardens! Our garden only gets water from the sky.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      I had to google “fizzy water.” 🙂

      Joanna’s comment reminded me of the first time I was in Australia and ordered iced tea. They had never heard of it. 🙂

      Like

  8. Marianna says:

    Family bringing soda to get togethers is a MAJOR pet peeve of mine!! Honestly, one meal with water or iced tea would not be the end of the world.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      I’m glad I’m not the only person who feels that way. 🙂

      Like

      • Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

        Bottled water, like San Marino or Perrier, has been around for ages – a natural extension of mineral baths and “taking the waters” for health. Heck, people have always been drawn to anywhere there’s a volcanic vent, with a hot spring the right temperature to cook their food, or have a bath…
        There have always been battles over water – from oasis’ in the Middle East to waterholes for livestock in the Old West – at least after use the water was still usable… But diverting a watercourse to irrigate a desert and then polluting it with agricultural toxins, or using water for extracting petrochemicals out of the ground? Omg, how can we be such short-sighted “bags of mostly water”!
        (Thanks for keeping the pot stirred; )

        Like

  9. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    Bringing pop to accompany the lovely dishes at a major family get-together? What an incredibly rude way to treat those whose labour produced the food. Besides, just the thought of it is enough to turn my stomach… (Why not save the soft drinks for all of those other high-end dishes like hotdogs and pizza?; )

    Like

    • Bill says:

      It wasn’t rude. The folks who brought the drinks are incapable of being rude, particularly to family. That’s just the culture here. I’ve known people to give babies soft drinks out of a baby bottle. For many people, it’s what you drink at meals.

      Everyone brought food to the dinner, including those who also brought coolers of soft drinks. We would have preferred that they try having a meal without soft drinks, but I suppose it wasn’t meant to be.

      Like

      • Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

        My apologies for the misunderstanding.

        Like

      • Bill says:

        The fault is with my post, not your comment. Now I’m imagining being invited to someone’s house for dinner and showing up with a cooler of Pepsi. That would be rude! I should’ve been clearer that folks were expected to contribute the meal. My objection is to their food choices, not their manners. But that certainly wasn’t clear from my post. 🙂

        Like

      • Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

        LOL, it’s a fine minuet we’re dancing here!
        Anyway, that’s the trouble with potluck dinners – you never know what the end result will be… (But, then again, that’s also the great thing about potluck, as well; )
        We are the same here. Well water is always the beverage of choice; plus an occasional glass of wine or whatever (and yes, every so often that includes the evil soda pop, with those aforementioned “high-end” meals; ) but most definitely a chunk of lemon, to kill the taste of “town” water; )

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s