Sunrise

I begin every morning by feeding the bottle babies, opening the coop, putting wood in the stove, and feeding and watering the chickens and the pigs. ย This time of year I also check on the goats to see if any kidded overnight. ย After checking on those in the pasture closest to our house, I walk to the other side of the farm and check on the goats there.

Last week I captured two beautiful sunrises over the more distant pasture. These were taken on consecutive days. The photos don’t do them justice, but they at least hint at how glorious they were.

IMG_5282

IMG_5315

Advertisements

31 comments on “Sunrise

  1. shoreacres says:

    Until I saw these photos, I never had thought about something else you have on the farm that city-dwellers don’t: a horizon. I wonder if anyone has done a study on the differences among people who live with and without a horizon. Sailing brought innumerable changes to my life, but I’ve never considered what influence living with that more expansive horizon might have brought.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Sarah says:

      Great point. For me personally, there is something about wide-open skies that makes me feel like I can breath more deeply. As a city dweller in a town that has up until recently had only one and two story buildings, the recent development of a number of 10 story buildings downtown has drastically changed the skyline in ways I’m not liking at all.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      I appreciate this reminder. It’s something I ought not take for granted.

      Your comment also brings to mind a song I really like. I’m sure you’ve heard “Cowboy Take Me Away” by the Dixie Chicks. There’s a line “I wanna look the horizon and not see a building standing tall.” If you know that song, read the lyrics or listen to it and mentally edit out the word “cowboy.” It gives it a whole different meaning.

      Like

  2. valbjerke says:

    Calendar…… ๐Ÿ˜Š

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bill says:

      We’re actually looking into the calendar idea thanks to you. The second picture would be good for one I think. Right now we’re (that’s “we’re” as in “Cherie”) is working on a seasonal eating cookbook.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. bobraxton says:

    sunrise on your shoulder makes me happy

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Now why did you have to go and do that?

      Like

    • bobraxton says:

      Washington D.C. – Saturday, February 7, 10 am โ€“ 1:00 pm;

      Sunday, February 8, 12:30 pm.

      Dr. Norman Wirzba, Professor of Theology and Ecology, Divinity School, Duke University,
      will be next McClendon Scholar in Residence. Focus of the weekend
      will be โ€œFood, Eating, and the Life of Faith.โ€

      Like

  4. Bill, some folks like sunrises and other enjoy sunsets. I like them both but if I had to choose, sunrise would be it. I’m sure that I’ve mention in a comment some where on this blog about how much I enjoy the sunrise while watching the world wake up from night time slumber. I have a cedar tree that grows right outside my bedroom window. During the warm months of the year I open the window to allow the night sounds to sooth me to sleep. For years around 5:30am or 6am, a bird would sit in that cedar tree and sing to me. It would be the first thing I heard every morning. I’m not sure if it was the same bird every year or if it could have been offspring but it was the best way to wake up ever. Alas the last couple years, my singing bird has not been there to sing me awake but I still have sweet memories of those days when a bird would sing to me every morning.

    Have a great sunrise on the farm day.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      We open the windows at night too, once winter is over. It’s great to wake up to birdsongs. But in our case they have to compete with rooster crows.

      I like sunrises too. It’s a great time of day.

      Like

  5. Laurie Graves says:

    Very beautiful! And let’s just say your landscape looks a tad different than the landscape in Maine right now ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Like

  6. Zambian Lady says:

    Like Shoeacres, my first thought on seeing the photos was ‘horizon’. I live in an apartment with other buildings nearby, but at least I see branches of the tree outside. I only see the sun for a few hours as it is hidden by the buildings – no beautiful sunrise or sunset for me unless I go elsewhere. You are fortunate to have the open and fresh spaces, but I do not envy you on the hard farm. I would enjoy the farm products, though ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

    • Bill says:

      I love farm life. I find it to be far less demanding than my city job was. It’s more physical labor of course, but a lot less stress and conflict.

      And the food is definitely better. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

  7. My favorite one was the second one, Bill, especially the way the sun filters through the winter trees. I lived in a city far too long, but always managed to escape through the wilderness trips I led. Now I have returned to my country roots and enjoy beautiful sunrises and sunsets daily. โ€“Curt

    Like

  8. Sunrise is one of the best things about getting up early. Love your photos!

    Like

  9. avwalters says:

    I have lived with a horizon, here, and in Two Rock, for eight years now, after 25 years in the city. It continues to take my breath away, daily. I love the ever-changing play of the light on the land and the way you learn to measure the passage of time by the light. I heard a disturbing thing recently–many friends have been posting amazing sunrise and sunset shots–pinks and apricots skies, oranges streaked with indigo, parfait skies with pink and blue layers. A friend in the science community mentioned that the intensity of color of late is because of nuclear contamination from Fukushima–the light passing through radionuclides and changing the spectrum. I don’t know if it’s true, but I found it deeply disturbing, because it does seem that the sky is more intense lately. Since there’s nothing I can do about it, I’m trying to accept the beauty, without wondering if there’s something more sinister in play.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      “Learning to measure the passage of time by the light.” You’re right of course. And isn’t it sad that we’ve generally lost that in our culture? Here the sun determines our work day, as it has for humans for thousands of years. In the city, for the most part it’s irrelevant.

      The contamination possibility is disturbing. Let’s hope it isn’t the case or that if it is the effects are short-lived. We play with such dangerous things.

      Like

  10. EllaDee says:

    Moments spent pausing and looking at the sky are never wasted, no matter the time of day, but sunrises tend to be, as you say, glorious ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

    • Bill says:

      You’re right of course. We’ve had cool clear days lately and with no humidity the sky is magnificent, especially at night. One can never go wrong with skygazing.

      Like

  11. farmerkhaiti says:

    beautiful! A stunning sunrise is just the icing on the “morning cake.” Love the horizon comment from shore acres, it is so true.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s