Kidding Continues

The kids keep coming.

A common nighttime sight in the barn these days.

A common nighttime sight in the barn these days.

A fiendish-looking Norma Jean and her kids.

A fiendish-looking Norma Jean and her kids.

A better picture of the babies

A better picture of the babies

We brought one of Justine's kids inside to warm her up, only for Justine to reject her. So she's our second bottle-baby of this season.  Say hello to Pearl.

We brought one of Justine’s kids inside to warm her up, only for Justine to reject her. So she’s our second bottle-baby of this season. Say hello to Pearl.

Bella's newborns.

Bella’s newborns.

These are Blondie's twins.  I think.  It's gets so confusing.

These are Blondie’s twins. I think. It’s gets so confusing.

Neo getting his bottle

Neo getting his bottle

Ginny helping Cherie feed Pearl

Ginny helping Cherie feed Pearl

We love it.

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25 comments on “Kidding Continues

  1. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, I’m glad to see that many more kids have been born without complication. I’ve been praying that you would have a season of minimum birthing complications. What will you do with all those goats? Your goat tribe will be huge after this birthing season is over. Do goats only have one birthing season a year? I know you let things happen on their schedule and am wondering if there will be another time of birthing in the fall.

    Have a continuing great birthing season day.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Oh, we’ve had plenty of complications too. That’s the norm with this breed. But we try to stay focused on the positive.

      We sell the weaned kids. Goats are an important part of our farm’s economic sustainability.

      The gestation period for a goat is 5 months and the kids are usually ready to wean at 3 months. Managed properly a doe will kid 3 times every 2 years.

      Like

  2. shoreacres says:

    Those kids are wonderful — no kidding! I finally went off to see how the noun and the verb are connected, and found this for “to kid”: “tease playfully,” 1839, earlier, in thieves’ cant, “to coax, wheedle, hoax” (1811), probably from kid (n.), via notion of “treat as a child, make a kid of.” Related: Kidded; kidding.”

    What I want to know is if either you or Cherie ever has uttered the phrase, “Oh, you kid!”

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Kids play like no other animal I’ve seen. I can understand how the word came to be mean playfulness.

      Interestingly, when I was growing up no one here used the word “kid” to mean child. I was probably a teenager before I ever heard that. Here children were children (sometimes pronounced “chillun”), young ‘uns, or (most commonly) chaps.

      Like

  3. I’m curious as to what you will do with all these goats as well. I have to admit, there are so many, they’re all twins, and they are all brown/white – I can’t tell them apart!

    Like

    • Bill says:

      For a while when they’re new born the kids are hard to tell apart. But they all have unique appearances (unlike cows) that become more pronounced as they get older. I like to have the eartags for easy identification but they’re really not necessary.

      Like

  4. Rachel says:

    That’s a lot of nearly-identical, but completely beautiful, babies! I’m a goat neophyte and I really only know what little I’ve read about them, other than watching the three goats that live in the pasture across the street, and I didn’t realize they had twins so frequently!

    Like

  5. Our neighbor raises goats, Bill, so I get to appreciate the kids, always cute. He has three large Turkish dogs that adopt and watch out for the babies along with the mom. –Curt

    Like

  6. Sarah says:

    SO adorable. Oh my.

    Like

  7. pattisj says:

    Baby animals are the cutest things!

    Like

  8. EllaDee says:

    The kids, momma goats… and Cherie are wonderfully photogenic. A potential kid calendar maybe 🙂

    Like

  9. Seeking Joyful Simplicity says:

    On the one hand, I am envious. Baby goats and lots of cuteness…and of course lots of work, round the clock. Goats are on my “some day” list.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      They’re really not a lot of work. During most of the year they require hardly any effort. If they kid in the winter it’s best to keep an eye on them and of course having bottle babies means feeding them 4 times a day. Some people practice a zero-intervention policy on kidding, but we’ve never developed the discipline for that. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. avwalters says:

    What great fun! (But why must they all be born at night.)

    Like

  11. jubilare says:

    Gah, so cute! Why are kids so utterly adorable?

    Like

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