The Only Chance

No two autumns are the same.  Weather affects when and how the leaves are colored.  They’re like a painting painted differently every fall.

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Nature has painted a pretty picture this fall.  Even though next year’s picture will also be beautiful, they’re all once-in-a-lifetime paintings.  This one will never happen again.

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There is a limit to the amount of autumns we’re allowed to enjoy.

They’re too precious to waste.

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29 comments on “The Only Chance

  1. DM says:

    beautiful! Thanks for sharing Bill and for taking the time to soak in the beauty of creation. Just knowing your story and how you stepped away from the craziness of corporate life to pursue what you are doing now, continues to give me a quiet joy.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. shoreacres says:

    Those reflections are one of the best reasons to have a pond. The photos are beautiful.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Thanks, but they’re not nearly as beautiful as they ought to be. The beauty of this season just can’t be captured in photographs (well, not mine at least).

      Like

  3. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, Autumn is indeed a time for reflection (pun intended) on the things of the past season. There have been some good things and some not so good things as with every season. The fall here has lingered longer than normal so enjoyment has been awesome. I am ready for the colder winter weather to begin. I’ve learned to always make time in my schedule to smell the season so to speak. Even the bitter cold or the not steamy summers days have virtue if I look for it. It makes me want to thank God for being alive.

    Have a great fall day in the outdoors.

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    • Bill says:

      A time for reflection. I like that. That would have been a good title for the post. 🙂

      You’re right about there being beauty and virtue in every season of course. I used to dislike winter. Now I’m kinda looking forward to it.

      Like

  4. bobraxton says:

    this morning reading Virginia Theological Seminary (Alexandria, VA) Dean’s commentary: … in the rough design of a labyrinth. Thanks to the expertise of Ms. Robin Denny, they are using a small-scale sustainable cultivation technique called System of Crop Intensification (SCI) which was developed by a Jesuit missionary in the 1980s. A small-scale SCI farmer in a village in northern India recently broke the world yield record for rice using SCI farming …

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    • Bill says:

      It’s so exciting to see sustainable agriculture being talked about in places that would have had no time for it a decade ago. Last night we went to Wake Forest University to hear Vanadana Shiva speak. Her talk was in the chapel and the place was packed to hear about sustainable agriculture. That would never have happened when I was in college.

      Like

  5. associatedluke says:

    When I dream of heaven, it’s always autumn.

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  6. Total agreement Bill. Beautiful photo. –Curt

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  7. Beautiful. And a good reminder. Thank you.

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  8. EllaDee says:

    Your words and photos speak to me. Autumn is my favorite season. I feel at home in its colors and climate 🙂

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  9. Just found your blog and spent way too much time running through previous posts….I loved spending time here..your pigs look very happy.

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  10. Dee Ready says:

    Dear Bill, your posting is so timely for me. Recently I got some health news that is a little concerning and so I’ve found myself anxious and begun to ponder my mortality. When I was young I really thought, as most young people do, that I was immortal. And throughout the following years, I seldom thought about death. But now, at 78, I’m realizing that time is limited and so I want to make these days ones in which I live the life of both spirit and heart’s desire. Peace.

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  11. allisonmohr says:

    Hey! I just found your blog from the Good Luck Duck’s blog. I have been reading backwards and enjoying it very much, especially the pig pictures. Anyone who thinks pigs don’t enjoy life and each other is not paying attention. I went to school at Averett for a year in 1970. I’ve never been back and find it interesting that there is now an environment that will support farm to table. It was not like that then. Good writing and thanks for taking the time.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Welcome! I always enjoy the posts at Good Luck Duck. I sometimes envy the wandering lifestyle. 🙂

      The chef at Averett was at Duke before coming here and he says the support for farm to fork was much better there. They’re committed to quality food, even if the student body doesn’t share their enthusiasm.

      Like

  12. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    Ho-lee Bill! Is that a pond or a lake in that second pic?
    They’re BOTH gorgeous (but I’m a sucker for Fall Foliage Photos anyway; )
    Thanks for sharing: )

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Around here we call it a pond, but I’ve had visitors who call it a lake. Like we say “woods” and in other places they say “forest.”

      Glad you enjoyed the photos. It’s a beautiful time of year.

      Like

  13. df says:

    I love the peacefulness of the autumn, the sense of everything making ready for a long rest. It’s beautiful, no doubt, but I also love it for the permission it gives to do less outdoors and narrow the focus a little. Can you tell that this time of year is when I have time to start reading again? You are so right about how precious each one is.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      I enjoy the slower pace too. Weeds and bugs just aren’t a problem this time of year. The days are shorter. There’s actually some time for reading and writing. Yet we’re not frozen in either. Autumn is hard to beat.

      Like

  14. Lovely photos. Autumn is my favorite season – I love the colors, the food, the first fires in the woodstove, and the slower pace (usually it’s a slower pace but this has been an extraordinarily busy fall for me!).
    Living in the Evergreen State, the abundance of fall color is not as present here as in your neck of the woods. You really have to seek it out. One of our goals for the farm is to plant a wide variety of trees – hardwoods in our woodlot for value-add purposes, for diversity(we have a lot of Douglas fir and Red alder), and especially for beautiful fall color.
    Don’t get me wrong – I adore all of the lush green, but a little splash of color here and there would certainly perk up the short and dark days here in the PNW.

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    • Bill says:

      Hardwoods in the woodlot are great for firewood too. We’re able to heat our house all winter using only trees that have fallen naturally during the year.

      The evergreens are especially nice to see in the winter, when all else is brown and white. 🙂

      Like

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