Fall Gardens and Foliage

Our weather has been spectacular lately.  It is forecast to take a turn for the worse soon, so we’re enjoying it while we can.

Our fall gardens went in late this year, but they’re starting to come in strong now.  Hopefully the weather will stay kind to them for a while.

Our Asian greens

Our Asian greens

More fall veggies

More fall veggies

Every year I try to capture the beauty of the trees in the fall and every year I fail.  Once again this year I can’t get a picture that does justice to them, but here are a few of my attempts.

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13 comments on “Fall Gardens and Foliage

  1. shoreacres says:

    I don’t think anyone, except maybe the best photographers, or the luckiest, can capture autumn. The photo in this set I most enjoy actually is the first. I’m intrigued and delighted by the colors in the garden plants — so much variety. I suspect some of that color is coming from some of those plants you talk about that I don’t yet know.

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    • Bill says:

      I love the different shades of green too. The first photo is (L to R), Maruba Santoh, tatsoi, senposai, arugula, komatsuna, Yukina Savoy, bok choy, two rows of mustard greens and one row of turnip greens. The second photo is (L to R), Brussels sprouts/mizuna/cabbage, broccoli, Tokyo Bekana/cabbage/broccoli, kohlrabi, broccoli, cauliflower, Chinese cabbage, Brussels sprouts and red cabbage.

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  2. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    Summer here was delayed. Cool. Wet.
    But Fall has been extra long and, so far up here in the Northumberland Hills, frost free… But that will most likely end this weekend, by the feel of it. Pretty sure we’ve beaten the odds for the last time, by the smell of the air and the fact that the valleys have been silver-coated more than once already.
    Your fields are beautiful…

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    • Bill says:

      That’s how it’s been here too. We had a cool wet summer and we’re having a warm dry fall (so far). The temps are going to start dropping over the next week though.

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  3. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    Like you, I’ve been taking photos of Fall Foliage for (a very long time; ) and the best ones are always from those overcast, gloomy days; where it either has been or is raining enough to wet the bark and deepen the intensity of colour; or when the sun is at the horizon in the Golden Hours of Dusk and Dawn…

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    • Bill says:

      I’m no photographer and the only camera I have is the one built into my phone. It does pretty good usually. This time of year the beauty often stops me in my tracks. But whenever I try to capture it in a photograph I’m always disappointed.

      Things are prettiest at dawn and dusk. Sunlight at dawn especially makes the yellows shine and sunlight at dusk makes the oranges glow. It’s amazing and I’ve never seen a picture that does it justice.

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      • Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

        Okay, so I don’t know if this’ll work, or not… (But don’t shoot me, if it does?)
        iPhone photo; taken at sunset… from left: Clump (White) Birch, Sugar Maple front right, Black Locust right rear… Assorted conifers (but mostly Red Pine and White Cedar) as backdrop.
        Ah shoot, I can’t paste it in… Darn!
        Anyway, the Maple in the foreground looks like its lit up like a torch: )

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  4. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, wow you have a large fall garden. It looks so clean and nice. The plants look so good. I did learn about fall gardens at the Mother Earth News Fair this last weekend. I also learned about cover crops for natural fertilization. I know Dad always planted clover in the small grain that would grow up the next year just in time to be plowed under and corn planted. In Nebraska all gardeners are one crop gardeners. They don’t plant behind the early crop. I did grow a Mesclun mix with lettuce and other greens one fall. I was so unfamiliar with Mesclun that I thought the package had been filled with weeds by mistake. I posted a picture on my blog and a comment from Chicago indicated that a Mesclun salad went for a premium price in Chicago. I still feel like a novice at gardening even though I’ve dabbled with gardening all my life. There’s just so much to learn about how to garden especially nature’s way. I know one thing I learned this year. Always have backup plants in case bad weather events happen. I won’t get caught without replacement plants again. This year I did have enough to plant a second time but not a third.

    Have a great fall garden day.

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    • Bill says:

      For the last couple of years we’ve been planting a lettuce mix from Johnny’s called “All Star.” It does well for us and is very popular with our customers (and with us). I know you’re not market gardening but people will pay a premium for convenience. They like to have something they can just pour right out of the bag and eat.

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  5. Farmgirl says:

    Most beautiful time of the year!

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  6. EllaDee says:

    Enlarged, the autumn colours of the photos are clearer. The vistas are just beautiful. I’m crazing space and sky 🙂

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