Sewing

I don’t know how to sew.  It’s one of many useful homesteading skills that I never learned.

Cherie, on the other hand, enjoys sewing and she’s been doing it since she was a girl.  In addition to whatever sewing needs doing around here she makes aprons and rice bags and sells them at the farmers market and craft shows.  Her work is beautiful and she has lots of happy customers.

IMG_4366

Cherie’s sewing room

Over the years I’ve worn holes into lots of pairs of blue jeans doing farm work.  Lately it occurred to me that rather than just using plain old patches to cover those holes, maybe I could find some of the kinds of patches we had our mother sew onto our jeans back in the early 70s.

peace sign

ecology flag

love

I wonder if Cherie would mind sewing them on for me?

 

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22 comments on “Sewing

  1. what a great idea! 🙂

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  2. Ru says:

    Wow I am more than slightly envious of Cherie’s beautiful sewing room! It’s on my learn-to-do list although I do know the absolute basics. I can sew a button on if I have to but I would love to be able to whip up an elegant ladies jacket in 8 hours they way they do on the Great British Sewing Bee. Oh well, one day soon.

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    • Bill says:

      She converted the room over our garage into her sewing room. She said she wanted a place in the house that was hers and she did a great job with it. But it gets pretty cold in there in the winter and hot in the summer, so it does have drawbacks.

      When she was growing up Cherie made her own clothes. These days she still sews a lot but it’s mostly aprons and crafts.

      There’s no point in me learning to sew. Cherie makes it unnecessary and my time is better spent trying to learn some of the many other essential homesteading skills that I lack. 🙂

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  3. shoreacres says:

    I never had any of those patches. I was just “that much” older, I guess. Instead of fancy patches, I’d get regular patches that Mom would embroider with flowers and such. Now, it’s iron-on patches when the need arises. They’re practical enough, but not nearly as much fun.

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    • Bill says:

      We also had our “race jackets” and we’d buy patches at the NASCAR races and have our mother sew them on for us. But that’s a whole ‘nuther post. 🙂

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  4. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, I’m back from a weekend of Mother Earth News Fair. So much pent up garden information and nothing to do with it until spring.

    I can sew on a button or patch a tear but even that is a struggle. My mother actually sewed my wife’s wedding dress and all the bride’s maid dresses for our wedding. All those skills are now lost as neither I nor my sister had any desire to learn sewing. It’s kind of sad in a way that those skills are fading away in the younger generation. Once again commercial convenience has taken over the market with cheap clothes.

    Have a great sewing patches on day.

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    • Bill says:

      Welcome back Dave. I’m sure the fair was great and you’re now loaded up with info. I started writing out what plans for next year after attending conferences. We’ve made some good changes based on things we learned that way.

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  5. Farmgirl says:

    Will look forward to the finished product! I miss those patches!

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  6. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    Groovy baby!
    Okay, so now that you’ve brought it up… Did your mother also sew trim (braid or rick-rack) over the old hem-marks on your jeans, after she’d let them down? Or was that more a Girl Thing (local phenomenon)?

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  7. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    I’m also lovin’ the great light (and organisation! : ) in Cherie’s Sewing Room… Beautiful! But – about the heat/cold thing – perhaps improved attic ventilation and insulation would help solve the problem? Or, now that it’s so nicely finished, would that be kinda like closing the barn door(should I say gate, LOL; ) after the horse is gone?

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    • Bill says:

      There is HVAC in there but it isn’t efficient. So she just uses a space heater when necessary and we keep the room closed off most of the time to avoid losing so much heat.

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  8. Wow! That is a pretty spectacular looking sewing room. I’m with Cherie – I think it is important to have a space of your own. I’m trying to figure out how to incorporate that into our home design, which will be a challenge as we are trying to keep it small and efficient.
    I have a lot of jeans with holes in the knees and was just thinking about those patches from my younger days wondering if I could find some. I recently patched holey knees in a pair of work pants with patches cut out from the tops of M’s waders that are beyond repair. Now my knees won’t get soaked when kneeling in the damp grass!

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    • Bill says:

      This is the space over the garage. On the plans it was called a “bonus room.” The kids used to hang out with their friends in there but once our nest was empty Cherie made it her space.

      I expect that if I get patches they will be the kind you’re using, not the kind we used to jazz up our jeans back in those days. 🙂

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  9. My mother didn’t approve of the patches, and worked very hard to patch my jeans with invisible patching -she cut up denim from other jeans and very carefully sewed it over the holes (I think on both sides), being careful to line up the bias and everything. I loved the smiley faces of the time, the daisies, and the peace signs…but she never went for it. On the other hand, I had very neat, presentable jeans!

    I too love Cherie’s sewing room. Mine is the dining room table, which is also where we eat daily, so not terribly convenient. I would love a dedicated space, but I don’t sew very often anymore, so it’s a very low priority.

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    • Bill says:

      At this moment our dining room table is covered with fabric and Cherie’s tools. She measures and cuts the fabric there and does her sewing in the sewing room. 🙂

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  10. avwalters says:

    I’m a competent seamstress. I do fine on mending and patching. I can sew some clothing and housewares. My sisters, though, are expert. They do beautiful precise, even tailored items. I hang my head in shame. (But really, your mom sewed on your funky patches for you! I thought every good hippy boy did that for himself.)

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    • Bill says:

      I was just a wanna-be hippie for a few years until I started wanting to be Elton John. I probably would’ve jabbed the needle into my finger if I tried to do sew it myself. My recollection is that our mother put them on with her sewing machine.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I remember those patches well, Bill. They also formed the basis for bumper stickers and innumerable other decorations. I was executive director of an environmental center in the early 70s and they were our stock in trade. 🙂 Wear them with pride! (laughing) –Curt

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