Nothing we do is insignificant.

We can claim the future we desire and act from it now. To do this takes the discipline of choosing where to focus our attention. If our brains, as neuroscience now suggests, take whatever we focus on as an invitation to make it happen, then the images and visions we live with matter a great deal. So we need to actively engage our imaginations in shaping visions of the future. Nothing we do is insignificant. Even a very small conscious choice of courage or of conscience can contribute to the transformation of the whole. It might be, for instance, the decision to put energy into that which seems most authentic to us, and withdraw energy and involvement from that which doesn’t.

Pat Farrell

Advertisements

8 comments on “Nothing we do is insignificant.

  1. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, it’s really tough to focus on any thing good because of all the distractions of the world. I’ve totally given up watching any kind of news. I get my news through conversations with other people. The media is so saturated with bad news that any one that watches with regularity will have to fight against negative thoughts. Life just works better if the talents and skills we have are used to follow our passions in life. For me, I started on the right track but got side tracked for over 40 years until retirement provided an opportunity to come back to my passion in life. Today’s culture will draw a person down the wrong path. I know so many adult kids (30 and below) that are just floating through life without any direction of where they want to go or do with their life. Granted, I know some that are very driven as well but it seems to me that many more don’t have that spark of passion for anything. I don’t know. Maybe I’ve just become the old geezer that don’t like how the world has changed. 🙂

    Have a great significant day.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      I don’t watch it either and the only newspaper I read is our community weekly, which is all local news. But I do scan the headlines every day and I often read commentary, so I know what the media’s attention is focused on and what it isn’t. I used to be pessimistic and often angry. But I’ve come to realize that as bad as things are and can seem to be, they’re getting better all the time. I choose to put my energy into working toward making the world a better place, rather than in concluding that it’s all going down the tubes. That’s very hard to do in our culture and I don’t do it well. But it’s what I’m trying to do.

      Like

  2. “the decision to put energy into that which seems most authentic … and to withdraw energy … from that which doesn’t ”

    The Pope suggested just this in South Korea yesterday. But it must be a tough sell, the South Koreans having learned their manners perfectly from us, the supremely unauthentic.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Like most people, I’ve been impressed with this pope. Unfortunately, Sr. Farrell and her colleagues probably don’t have a very high opinion of him, in light of their continuing tiff.

      Like

  3. Martha Caldwell-Young says:

    “…If our brains, as neuroscience now suggests, take whatever we focus on as an invitation to make it happen, then the images and visions we live with matter a great deal. …”

    A somewhat frightening notion but at the same time very empowering. It certainly calls for us to take complete responsibility for what we experience as we move through life.

    Like

  4. ain't for city gals says:

    We had eight months after my dad was diagnosed with lung cancer….towards the end we had a wonderful hospice nurse (who was our friend before….they gave her a special “dispensation” as they don’t usually let you have a hospice nurse that you know)….Anyway, I will always remember one thing she told my dad “You have only so much energy now each day….you must choose how you want to spend it” We all chose to use it loving each other….it was a beautiful thing and something I will never forget.

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Thanks for sharing that beautiful story. As many have said, we should always live like we are dying. So glad you had that special time with you dad, and the wisdom of that nurse.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s