Watermelon After All

Some of y’all will probably remember me whining complaining about deer eating our watermelon plants.  They did a lot of damage, but we sacrificed the last of the spring kale and moved the deer fence protecting it to the watermelon garden instead, in the hope that it would keep them out. Fortunately it did (or they lost interest as the plants grew) and now we’re harvesting watermelons.

This year we raised Crimson Sweets and Moon and Stars Yellow Fleshed.

Crimson Sweet

Crimson Sweet

Moon and Stars

Moon and Stars

Both are big delicious melons.  Crimson Sweet is the sweetest, best-tasting watermelon I’ve ever eaten. Moon and Stars is another old heirloom, but far less known.  It was thought to be extinct before a seed-saver discovered it growing on a farm in Missouri in the late 1980s.  Not as sweet as the Crimson Sweet (nothing is) it has a great texture and delicious refreshing taste.

Most of our customers want Crimson Sweets, and that is understandable.  A few who are adventurous, or who remember Moon and Stars from their childhoods, are enjoying those as well. We’re pleased that the deer spared some for us.

Watermelons like hot weather.  Once the fruit has set, too much water will diminish their sweetness.  So the cool wet weather we’re having these days isn’t helping them finish strong.  And since we don’t use any plastic mulch on our farm the weeds are out of control and they’re not helping either.

But I’ll keep searching them out and I expect to eat watermelon every day for at least another month.  It’s one of the joys of August.

 

Advertisements