The Earth’s White Blood Cells

We hold a weekly meeting of all employees of White Flint Farm on Sunday mornings.  In other words, once a week I have an extra cup of coffee and Cherie and I discuss farm planning and other business and administrative issues that need attention.  This time of year is so busy on the farm that if we didn’t carve out specific time for that sort of thing, it wouldn’t happen and important things would fall through the cracks.

Last Sunday we were reflecting on coming off the farm’s best week ever.  We’re adding new customers every week as the word spreads about our farm and what we’re doing here.  Folks who try our veggies almost always come back for more.  It’s very encouraging.

We just added another delivery drop to our schedule, so we’re now doing four of them each week, as well as selling at the farmers market and off the farm by appointment.  It’s keeping us very busy but we’re thrilled to see the booming interest in chemical-free, ethically-produced, locally-grown food.  Our community has been slow to get on board with this movement, but I believe the tide has now turned.

On a podcast I was listening to yesterday the podcaster commented on how the human body has natural defense mechanisms that activate when the body is threatened by illness.  Perhaps, she said, the growing food and permaculture movements are like the earth activating its own defense mechanism to fight the disease of industrial food.  I like that image.  We are the earth’s white blood cells.

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23 comments on “The Earth’s White Blood Cells

  1. I absolutely Love this post. It’s encouraging and uplifting to hear of the progress you’ve made, and the opportunities you’re providing for your community, and thus for all of us, really.

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    • Bill says:

      Thanks Teresa. I’m encouraged and uplifted by the progress the community is making. We have a LONG ways to go, but I think the seeds of positive change are being planted.

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  2. here’s to growing white blood cells one row at a time.

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  3. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, I’m glad to hear about your successes. The reason we become farmers is to experience the joy and satisfaction that come through the struggles and challenges. Farming will intensify every emotion imaginable. At the end of the season no matter what the out come, we are always ready to do it all over again. Farmers have hope and faith that the future will provide what they need. We have learned that even though nature can be harsh, there’s still expectation of harvest.

    White blood cells, huh. I like it.

    Have a great busy day in the garden.

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    • Bill says:

      In farming there are so many things that can go wrong. And in our kind of farming there is no safety net. But that’s the way it goes and always has. As you say, no matter what happens, there is always an expectation of a harvest.

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  4. Gwen Wells says:

    Over here trying to come up with something clever to say about the white blood cells and booming business at the farm– All I can come up with is YAY! I am so grateful that you and Cherie do what you do. Keep up the great work, and I’ll do all I can to spread the news down here in Altavista. (And buying your eggs. And beans. And anything else I have no luck growing:)

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  5. Great image. So where do the red blood cells fit in? Also laughed at you employees’ meeting. –Curt

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  6. Laura says:

    So glad to hear the farm is busy and doing well. Yesterday I was at lunch with a coworker and we were talking about pesticides, hormones etc and he said, “Well what are we supposed to do? We can’t change anything” I told him that it’s all about the small farm movement. If people start going to farmers markets and supporting their local farmers, things will change, one person at a time.

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  7. associatedluke says:

    Keep up the awesome work of fighting disease! Rawk on! Happy to have made your acquaintance in this medium.

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  8. EllaDee says:

    Those meetings are essential, even the G.O. and I have them… without communication even our lives would be difficult to manage.
    When I see your posts, I imagine how they reflect ethical farmers globally and I feel the positive ripples ebbing out, energizing the good food movement and spreading the effect ever further. And I see it here with more markets, producers-sellers and buyers. I see the supermarkets emulating it competing for the niche. It is making a difference.

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    • Bill says:

      I see it here too EllaDee. It’s exciting to see it sweeping across culture. Nature always acts to correct imbalances. We must be part of that.

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  9. avwalters says:

    Well, if that’s the case, we’d better get a move on. There’s plenty of work to be done.

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  10. Katie Rosson says:

    I’m so happy that we no longer have to drive an hour or more to get good produce! I agree that our area and the rest of the country is moving away from bad food choices but sometimes I feel it’s slower than others. Better slow than not at all!

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    • Bill says:

      Thanks for supporting the farm Katie. We love knowing that our food is going to people who enjoy and appreciate it!

      May the day soon come when our public health disaster is just a fading memory.

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  11. shinzodiac says:

    What was the name of the podcast and episode?

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