Welcoming the Tomatoes

We’ve been eating lots of tomatoes lately.  Garden-fresh tomatoes are one of the things that make summer so wonderfully delicious.

We have six varieties coming in now, the best of which are the heirloom German Johnsons, and we have more on the way, set to mature in about a month.

Behold, the magnificent German Johnson

Behold, the magnificent German Johnson

They weigh over a pound each.

They weigh over a pound each.

After losing our tomato crop to blight last year it’s a great relief to have them coming in strong.

We’re eating very well these days.  We’re also harvesting peppers, eggplant, squash, zucchini, cucumbers, green beans, October beans, potatoes and onions.

Ratatouille on the way

Ratatouille on the way

But best of all are the tomatoes.

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15 comments on “Welcoming the Tomatoes

  1. nebraskadave says:

    Bill, you are a garden blessed man. The only thing that I’ve harvested from my garden has been a few radishes and lettuce earlier in the year. My garden scheduler has declared that the cabbages are ready to be harvested but I think I’ll let them go just a bit longer before I make kraut with them. My neighbor wanted cherry tomatoes and bought two plants this spring but could find a good place to plant them in her yard so gave them to me to raise for her. It’s not the same as a real tomato but the little succulent morsels are a welcome taste until the real thing arrives. I seriously doubt any of the little tomatoes ever make it out of the garden area of the back yard. Vine to mouth is the best way to enjoy these tasty little mouthfuls.

    Have a great harvesting day.

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    • Bill says:

      One of the things I’ve come to enjoy about blogging is learning how different the growing seasons are in other places. Our cabbages burned about long ago. Most days here now the temps climb well into the 90s.

      I planted lots of cherry tomatoes this year and they’re starting to come in. I eat them like candy when I’m in the garden.

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  2. ain't for city gals says:

    yum…real food!

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  3. A POUND each!! We can only dream. Little hard green bobbles on my tomato plants right now, those that have got that far – most are still in the flowering stage. I realize variety has a lot to do with it, but I seriously doubt that even at the fair on Labour Day weekend will I see anything in the one pound range. Well done. They make the zuke look puny…

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    • Bill says:

      We can grow the big ugly slow-maturing heirlooms here thanks to our long hot growing season. And they are wonderfully delicious!

      We grow some smaller slicers too, as well as Romas and cherries. But these crazy-shaped giants are my favorite. 🙂

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  4. Dani says:

    Bill – They look delicious. Don’t forget to make tomato powder from the skins… 🙂

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  5. Agreed… nothing like ripe tomatoes right out of the garden! Ours are just coming in but we have been chowing down on delicious strawberries and sugar snap peas. The German Johnson’s look like a meal in themselves. 🙂 –Curt

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    • Bill says:

      Those big German Johnsons are more than one meal for me. 🙂

      Strawberries and sugar snap peas are long gone here. But that’s some mighty fine eating. It’s hard to beat them straight from the garden too.

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  6. Joanna says:

    I have garden envy. Our first tomatoes are only just ripening, but we’ve had the worst of summers so far, first too dry, then too wet and temperatures are all over the place. In fact I swear that our chickens think it is fall, some are losing their feathers.

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    • Bill says:

      Things have returned to normal here–hot and dry. Last year we had a bizarre summer–wet and cool. Every year is different it seems.

      Hoping Mother Nature starts treating you better and you have an abundant harvest!

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      • Joanna says:

        The last few years have been very strange indeed for us. It is bad enough trying to get the hang of the seasons here, having only lived in Latvia for 7 years and the last three have been totally different to the previous four years. Here’s for an abundant harvest for both of us. Thanks!

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  7. shoreacres says:

    I don’t know what variety I picked — there wasn’t a sign on all the rows, and I forgot to ask. But I had some that were big, and knobby, and more delicious than anything I’ve ever had. I do know they were an heirloom variety. We’re about done with tomatoes at my local farm now. The blackberries have finished, too. But the fig trees are bearing like crazy. Since it’s so close, I’ve been going out about every three days and picking enough to munch on, fresh.

    But I’ve still got enough tomatoes for two or three good BLTs. And the sweet corn is abundant now – the kind we call sugar and cream, a yellow and white mix.

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    • Bill says:

      I am so glad that you discovered that farm. It sounds excellent, and as a farmer I know how good it is to have patrons who appreciate what you do.

      So interesting that the tomatoes are fading out there just as they’re starting to come in here. And as you can see in the other comments for many people they haven’t yet arrived. I’ve enjoyed following along with the garden experiences of folks in so many different growing zones.

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