Outbid

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Today’s post should be about our adding this handsome couple to our herd.  I took some goats to market yesterday and they were there for sale.  Our young buck Valentino never lived up to his name, having no interest in doing his job no matter how much his pasture-mates wanted him to.  So I’ve been on the lookout for a suitable replacement.  We don’t like to introduce a new goat into the herd alone, so I decided to buy the pretty doe being sold with him too.

They were among the last goats sold at the auction, so I spent too much of a beautiful afternoon at the market. And to my surprise when the doe came in the bidding was very lively.  The price went much higher than I had expected and eventually I dropped out.  I didn’t want to buy the buck alone so I didn’t bid on him.  I came home without either of them, fretting the whole way that I should have stayed in and bought them.

I’m no good at auctions.  But the next time I find goats I want, I’m not going to get outbid.

Well, we’ll see.

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12 comments on “Outbid

  1. Leigh says:

    Auctions intrigue me but I’m extremely timid about trying my hand at one. Too bad it didn’t work out, but I’m sure something will.

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    • Bill says:

      I had underestimated what these two would sell for, and there’s no time to rethink things during the auction. Next time I’m going to have in mind the number above which I will not go.

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  2. shoreacres says:

    I can see why you’d be attracted to them. They really are an unusually handsome pair — the American Gothic of goats. She’s especially pretty, at least to this untrained eye.

    It takes a whole lot of discipline to do well at auctions. Back in the day, I did well at eBay auctions, but I’ve only participated in a very few live auctions — farm sales, all. I usually was after boxes of dishes or books, which is a different thing. You can get a pile of books that way for $5.

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    • Bill says:

      What most attracted me to them was their temperament. The doe was not at all afraid of me and would let me touch her. The male was a little shy but not aggressive at all. It was clear that they had been raised by good farmers. There were some other good-looking young bucks in the auction but they were terrified of humans. Not a good sign.

      I bought a lot of books off ebay many years ago. Haven’t looked at that site in a long time. Farm sales are a great way to get tools too. The problem I have is that they’re usually on Saturdays when we’re at the market.

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  3. EllaDee says:

    Head over heart at auctions is a good thing. But they were nice looking goats. There will be another day.

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    • Bill says:

      Goat sales are once a month and this is the second month in a row I’ve come home empty-handed. When I saw this pair I was glad I didn’t get the goats I bid on in June. Hopefully the same thing will happen in August.

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  4. bobraxton says:

    sorry. I certainly identify

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    • Bill says:

      I’ve got two pastures with goats in them. In one they’re all females and in the to other the buck is too old to do his job. That’s not a good set-up for a goat farmer.

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  5. Cro Magnon says:

    I’d always imagined that these things were done between breeders, rather than through auctions. Here there are NO livestock markets, so it’s all done by personal contacts.

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    • Bill says:

      We prefer to sell directly off the farm, but most of our sales end up going through the local livestock market. There’s not much demand for goat meat here so the goats usually end up being bought for slaughter and sale in the northeast.

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  6. Your trip to market reminded me of Christopher Corr’s book, The Goggle-Eyed Goats – http://blog.rowleygallery.co.uk/the-goggle-eyed-goats/.

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    • Bill says:

      I love it. 🙂
      Beautifully illustrated. I’d like to have a copy to read to my children at bedtime, but they’re now in their 20s and I’m sure they’d think that weird. 🙂

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