Morning Chores

My days always begin with morning chores.  There’s not much to them this time of year–let the chickens out, feed the goats, put wood in the stove.  Some cold mornings I’m slow to get started.  This was one of them.

The view I have from our backyard, on the way to the barn.

The view I have from our backyard, on the way to the barn.

It's hard to get kids to stand still long enough for a picture.

It’s hard to get kids to stand still long enough for a picture.

This is one way to do it.

This is one way to do it.

Walking to the chickenhouse.

Walking to the chickenhouse.

Here comes the sun.

Here comes the sun.

Some of your young hens insist on roosting in the nesting boxes.  To try to break them of that I've been draping a tarp over them at night.

Some of our young hens insist on roosting in the nesting boxes. To try to break them of that I’ve been draping a tarp over the nesting boxes at night.

Elvis and one of his ladies.

Elvis and one of his ladies.

Heading home.

Heading home.

The goats are starting to wander out.

The goats are starting to wander out.

But it’s a beautiful frosty morning here, so it was a nice way to start the day.

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14 comments on “Morning Chores

  1. Thank you for the photographs. The perspective was inspirational. From our house, if I threw a small rock hard enough, I could manage to hit the chicken coop, the goat shed, and the pig shed. Your journey is beautiful, but long… a blizzardy morning on your farm might just push me over the edge.
    I was late rising this morning also. No one’s alarm went off and we were in a mad scramble to get the kids up, fed, and to school on time. Rather than submit to THAT chaos, I volunteered to do the morning chores. It was snowing and cold and Dave thought he’d gotten the better end of the deal by staying inside and making a fire and coffee.
    Once outside, that blissful silence smoothed me right out. I could hear the roosters crowing from inside the shed and the goats bleating instantly upon hearing the sound of my boots crunching in the snow. And it was also a nice way to start the day.

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    • Bill says:

      I love the peace and quiet of winter. I don’t mind the wet snowy rainy mornings much, but clear cold mornings like this are the best.

      I could probably hit our barn with a rock from our back door (although I’d probably throw out my shoulder doing it). It’s pretty close to the house The chicken coop is a bit farther, but it’s not too bad. It’s a pretty good hike to the pigs’ shed, but they’re not here in the winter. If I walk to the front pasture, it’s about 1/3 of a mile. I actually enjoy the walks. Most of the time.

      I remember the first time I went to New England. I was surprised at how close the barns were to the houses. Thinking about the winters, I saw that it made sense.

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  2. shoreacres says:

    My only morning chore is brushing the cat, I suppose – but she’s as insistent we keep to the routine as I suppose your goats and chickens are.

    The frost is beautiful. We do have that from time to time, but I’ve not seen any yet this year, except in Kansas. We have the sun and quiet mornings, though, so we make do with those and give thanks. (I give special thanks that I don’t have to waste the morning with an hour-long commute!)

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    • Bill says:

      Amen to the joy of no commute. I’m very happy not to have that in my life.

      The first killing frost here is dreaded. After that, it really is a beautiful sight.

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  3. El Guapo says:

    There’s something in the tranquility of those pictures that grabs me.

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  4. Nice photo stroll. It’s the perk of getting up early, the chance to see an amazing sunrise, and it’s funny how many of them are amazing when you are around often enough to notice. Good idea with the tarp – I’m having the same issue, I’ve been using old chicken wire, it’s too bent and twisted to do a good job, and they’re worming their way through. I’ll have to try the tarp idea.

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    • Bill says:

      A group of our young pullets took to roosting on the edges of the boxes, facing outward. Nearly every day ever single nesting box was filled with poo. I’ve been draping the tarp over the boxes the last few evenings. Last night there were only 3 settling in to roost there (versus at least 12 a few days earlier). They’re starting to become accustomed to other locations. Hopefully I won’t have to do this much longer.

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  5. Bob Braxton says:

    this land I was born in on one frosty mornin’

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