Finding Stuff

Following up on my recent post about stuff I find in the garden, and allowing myself to belief that someone might actually find that sort of thing interesting, I thought I’d share photos of a couple of things that have turned up lately.

This plow point for example.

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I’ve been tending the garden where I found this for years.  How did it escape detection for so long?

And this horse shoe (actually most likely a mule shoe).

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I wonder how long ago it was lost.  We still used draft animals on my grandfather’s farm when I was very young, but by the time I was ten or so they’d been retired in favor of tractors.  It’s been even longer since they were used on our farm.  So I don’t know from personal experience, but I suspect having a mule lose a shoe was the equivalent of having a flat tire today.

I’ve found lots of them (and lots of plow points) on the farm over the years.  I added this one to a collection in our equipment shed.

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Makes me wonder if some gardener in the future will find my lost reading glasses, for example, and in turn wonder about the person who lost them.

12 comments on “Finding Stuff

  1. shoreacres says:

    They’ll probably just think you were trying to “read the land” and figure out what to do next. 😉

    There’s a Muleshoe, Texas, by the way. It has a statue of a mule and hosts the national muleshoe pitching contest every July 4.

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    • Bill says:

      Mule shoes are smaller than horse shoes ,but I can’t look at one know which it is. But I heard from my aunt yesterday after she saw this post. She said her father (my grandfather) raised mules and workhorses, but only used horses for work on the farm. He sold the mules. So it’s more likely that this is a horseshoe.

      Before hearing from her I did’t realize that mules weren’t used to work this farm during the generation of her childhood. But interestingly (to me at least) my grandfather on my mother’s side (which is where I did farmwork as a child) never used mules either. He just didn’t like them. His favorite work horse (and mine) was a big gentle Clydesdale named Champ, who us kids use to rid bareback, often several of us at a time. But I digress….

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  2. It’s fun to turn up these things, knowing they were of great use at one time right on the land you’re walking on.
    I was telling someone last night, I have a few pairs of reading glasses just in case … I recall Burgess Meredith in a “Twilight Zone,” how he dropped and broke his glasses as he was going gaga over a library he found after catastrophe had struck. I wouldn’t want to be without.

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  3. jubilare says:

    I live in the suburbs of a relatively big city, so the kinds of things I find are a bit different, but there have been some interesting ones. A glass fishing-net float, a child’s toy pistol and old metal truck that looks to be from the fifties, and lots of freshwater shells and marbles.
    Sadly, I also have to be very careful when I dig because of broken glass.

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    • Bill says:

      We turn up a lot of broken glass too. The garden where I found the horse shoe is near very close to the spot where I lived as a child. I’ve found marbles and toys in it that I recall from my childhood. I found a couple of marbles (including one I actually recognize) this year. Last year I found one of those little plastic soldiers that all boys had back in the day.

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  4. Over the decades, we’ve found a silver pencil, a silver pocket watch, dozens of horseshoes, coins, etc. The pigs this summer unearthed a pair of vice grips and a screwdriver that were lost about 5 years ago. The soil/ground isn’t as static as we tend to think – frost and seismic action have an effect here, as well as the more obvious earthworms, pigs and garden forks.

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    • Bill says:

      Those are some treasures. Mostly I find “junk” and trash. But I sometimes find arrowheads. I’ve found several coins, the oldest being a penny from the 1840s. At the bottom of a pile of trash and junk in one of our outbuildings my son found a rare Confederate belt buckle. You make a great point about nature helping unearth these things.

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  5. EllaDee says:

    How wonderful you dig up relics of the past. We have an old house in a country village, and find small toys in the garden, horseshoes, etc. We also found an old fake Christmas tree under the house from quite early, I think, in their existence. We feel these belong to the house and so place them around, similar to you. As we didn’t have one, we use the Christmas tree. And I also have a piece of old metal similar to your plow point but with a right angle, that makes a great bookend. I recently dug up an old leather knife sheath that the G.O. lost approx 10 years ago, prior to my time at the house, tha had been appropriated by his dog, so there may be hope for your reading glasses. If you buy a new pair, the old ones are sure to show up.
    The G.O. works in earthworks and is constantly bring home old bottles, coins, marbles and odd items. We love them and add them to our collection, so it’s great to see what you unearth.

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    • Bill says:

      I love that you try to reuse the things you find. I think it is especially wonderful that you use the Christmas tree! We reuse any old Mason jars we find that aren’t broken. I’ve found old tools, fence posts, etc. and repurposed them.
      As for my reading glasses, I lose or destroy so many of them around here that I buy the cheapest ones I can find, a half dozen at a time. 🙂

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      • EllaDee says:

        My favorite find is a 60’s (my era) plastic girl’s dress up ring with a huge pink plastic stone, which we refer to as my engagement ring, to freak the G.O.’s mum out 🙂

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  6. TexWisGirl says:

    that’s really cool. i like how the earth ‘eaves and hos’ (as well as we sometimes ‘hoe’) to bring stuff up from below. 🙂

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