Wildflowers

There are some really awesome wildflower blogs out there, by excellent photographers who are very knowledgeable about wildflowers.  This isn’t one of them.

I confess that way too often I just take the wildflowers for granted.  I don’t appreciate them as much as I should.

Even this time of year, I’m surrounded by them all day.  Here are some that I saw while doing chores this morning.

Note the cherry tomatoes growing wild in the background

Note the cherry tomatoes growing wild in the background

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A sand brier

A sand brier

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Goldenrod

Goldenrod

Ladino clover

Ladino clover

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Not a wildflower technically.  But I didn't plant it.  It's a volunteer tomato plant.

Not a wildflower technically. But I didn’t plant it. It’s a volunteer tomato plant.

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Lespedeza

Lespedeza

Poke weed

Poke weed

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Red clover

Red clover

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16 comments on “Wildflowers

  1. Bob Braxton says:

    tomatoes growing wild we called “volunteer”

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  2. Leigh says:

    So that’s Lespedeza. We have a very similar plant here and there but I’ve not seen it bloom yet. Now I know what to look for because the goats can eat it.

    That last photo is of what I call Deadly Nightshade. The goats can’t eat that.

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    • Bill says:

      Lespedeza grows long and stemmy. It’s good forage. We call this one wild lespedeza, but I think it’s sericea lespedeza, which is invasive.

      The last photo is actually Carolina horsenettle, which we call “sand briers.” It’s one of the few things our goats won’t eat.

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  3. Yay, up the wildflowers! They are hugely important for pollinating insects and support life itself. What’s not to like?!

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  4. shoreacres says:

    Some I recognize, but some are new. I got curious about the pokeweed, wondering if there truly is a poke salad. Turns out there is (DON’T eat the stuff raw!!!), and you can read all about the plant here.

    There’s even a Poke Salad Festival in Blanchard, Louisiana, and of course….

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    • Bob Braxton says:

      … in the American South people cook and eat the leaves of young poke plants (taller, older ones are too tough). … boil the leaves three times, discarding the water each time. When finished, the dish is called a mess of poke sallet (a “mess” is a lot of something edible cooked and/or collected; you can have a mess of beans or a mess of pottage), and typically one flavors poke sallet with salt, pepper and animal fat (fatback, a ham hock or bacon grease). Some add sugar. This makes a spinach-like cooked green similar to collards.
      http://jennifersaylor.wordpress.com/2007/08/08/southbound-1-poke-sallet/

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    • Bill says:

      Great video! I’m really glad you shared it.

      I’ve never eaten poke salad, but plenty of folks around here used to (and some still do). We may try it some time. It grows wild all over the place here. The poke berries will stain your hands (or whatever else they touch) dark red, as I learned as a boy. In this video Johnny Cash says they used them to make warpaint and that he’d mash them on his sister’s back while they were picking cotton. We’d use them as paint too. Southerners used them as makeshift ink during the Civil War.

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  5. Our wildflowers are starting to wane now, but a few weeks ago they were filling the ditches and every meadow. Love this time of year…

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  6. Bob Braxton says:

    although goldenrod tea is a wholesome beverage, a toxic fungus that sometimes grows on the leaves may poison tea made from infected leaves. So make sure there are no problems with the leaves: http://www.eattheweeds.com/solidago-odora-liberty-tea-2/

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