Last Visit of the Summer

Our granddaughter Rayne starts school today (much to her disappointment).

We enjoyed having her here last weekend for one final visit of the summer.

SAMSUNG

SAMSUNG

SAMSUNG

SAMSUNG

Advertisements

21 comments on “Last Visit of the Summer

  1. Jeff says:

    The first thing that popped into my mind is that she is going to prison – look at those bars behind her! And even though she has a smile on her face, her body language is so different from the that in other pictures. She’s trapped now when once she was free. I’m sure she learned a lot more during her time with you than she’ll “learn” in school!

    Like

    • Bill says:

      She likely feels something like being imprisoned. She’s an active child, not well-suited for sitting still in a classroom full of other kids all day.

      She peppers us with questions the entire time she’s here. Hopefully she learned some things of value.

      Like

  2. Bob Braxton says:

    like photo of the hen-spection

    Like

  3. shoreacres says:

    I wish the kids today could look forward to the first day of school the way we did. It was nearly a high holy day, and all of the rituals – the new pencil box, deciding what would be in my lunch, trying on the new dress Mom had made me – were sheer delight.

    It’s funny. I loved school (well, until junior high, when adolescence took over with its attendant anxieties, etc.) and always looked forward to the first day. Of course, my school days are so long ago that ink pens, bottles of ink and blotters were part of the supplies – at least, by third grade. That’s the year we began to learn cursive.

    The biggest difference between then and now? The degree of freedom we had. We could wear what we pleased – no dress codes. We walked to school by ourselves, or rode our bikes. We ate what we pleased at lunch – we could have a sack lunch, eat “hot lunch” at school or even go home if we lived close enough to be back by the time the bell rang.

    When morning and afternoon recess came, no one “organized us”. We ran outdoors, we played, we came in. And within the constraints of learning our “readin’, writin’ and ‘rithmetic”, we had a lot of freedom to pursue what interested us.

    Of course, I grew up in Iowa in the days when the speed limit signs on the highway read “Reasonable And Proper”. Think about that for a minute.

    Like

    • Jeff says:

      Do you know any place that I could see a picture of a speed-limit sign that says “Reasonable and Proper”? That blows me away – I’d love to see a picture of one!

      Like

      • shoreacres says:

        I couldn’t find one online just now, but I’ve already decided the topic deserves a blog post – I remember a certain incident in those days when my dad got stopped. I’ll keep looking, because I’ll want one for my blog post.

        Like

      • shoreacres says:

        Well! It’s not Iowa, but Montana’s version is pretty good. Reasonable and Prudent

        Like

      • Jeff says:

        That says so much about community and responsibility to others, doesn’t it? Somehow, we need to get back to that state of mind. Thanks for the link – I passed it on to a blogging friend in Montana – she might know the blogger.

        Like

    • Bill says:

      I liked going to school too (although I couldn’t have admitted that to some of my friends). Institutional school is designed for people like me, who don’t mind sitting still and doing what they’re told. It is pure torture for kids like Tom Sawyer. And of course there is a broad spectrum in between. Rayne falls somewhere in that spectrum.

      My recollection is that Nevada had no speed limit per se until recently. There too the signs just said to drive at a safe speed. If I recall correctly the holdout states (like Montana and Nevada) were required by the federal government to comply with the mandatory 55 mph limit by a threat to withhold federal highway funds if they didn’t. This is how the federal government forced states to raise their legal drinking ages as well, iirc.

      Like

      • Jeff says:

        O.K. – here’s the story. In 1974, during the oil embargo, the federal government required all states to lower their maximum speed limit to 55 m.p.h. speed limit, to reduce the demand for gasoline. In 1995, when the federal government repealed that requirement, Montana went to a “reasonable and prudent” speed limit for some vehicles. That mostly applied to passenger cars, so speed demons from all over the country came to Montana to play Joe Race Car Driver on the Montana interstates. The accident rate soared, Congress was not pleased, and many Montanans weren’t, either. The result was the passage of a law that set the speed limit at 75 m.p.h. So much for the existence of an “invisible hand” in that “free market”, eh?

        Like

      • Bill says:

        Interesting. It appears that the numerical limit was imposed by the legislature after the Montana Supreme Court struck down the “reasonable and prudent” limit as unconstitutionally vague. Someone was ticketed for speeding and appealed the conviction, leading to the decision (in 1998) that no one could be ticketed in Montana based on speed alone in the absence of a stated numerical speed limit.

        I was probably confusing it with the mandatory legal drinking age law. Per Wiki: The National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984 (23 U.S.C. ยง 158) was passed on July 17, 1984 by the United States Congress as a mechanism whereby all states would become thereafter required to legislate the age of 21 years as a minimum age for purchasing and publicly possessing alcoholic beverages. Under the Federal Aid Highway Act, a state with a minimum age below 21 would be subjected to a ten percent decrease in its annual federal highway apportionment. By 1995 all states had acquiesced, although Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Guam (until 2010) kept the age at 18 and took the cut in highway funding. Interestingly, the U.S. is only one of 3 developed nations with a legal drinking age above 18, the other two being Iceland and Japan (20 in those countries).

        All very interesting, even if pretty far afield from a post about my granddaughter’s last visit to the farm before school starts. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

      • Bill says:

        And are you sure the accident rate soared after the no speed limit law returned? Just googling it I see numerous references to the Montana Speed Limit Paradox, according to which fatal accidents were lower with no stated speed limit than with one in place. Fatalities increased dramatically once the numerical speed limit was imposed. http://www.hwysafety.com/hwy_montana.htm

        Like

      • Jeff says:

        I was unable to find statistics from the Montana Highway Patrol (they, not the Montana DOT, would be in charge of accident investigations on Interstates, I believe), so I am not able to either refute or confirm your findings. My source for the assertion that the accident rate soared is a long-time Montana resident, who was relying on memory. Memory can be fallible, as we all know. I note, however, that no link to the source was provided on the web page you linked to. He only thanks Jack Williams, in the Montana DOT, for his assistance in “collecting the highway accident data.” I’m not a lawyer, but if I was, I wouldn’t go to court with that information.

        Like

  4. Bob Braxton says:

    from Virginia Theological Seminary website Dean’s Commentary: program for the Diocese of Virginia Stewardship of Creation conference I was impressed. On Saturday September 21, beginning at 10am finishing at 4pm at the Church of our Saviour in Charlottesville VA, there is a day of exploration on the Challenge of Food Sustainability. They have attracted some distinguished speakers: John Seiler, Professor in the Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation from Virginia Tech, the Rev. Richard Cizik, who runs the New Evangelical Partnership for the Common Good, James Baird from the American Farmland Trust, and finally Michael Rodemeyer, the Executive Director of the Science and Technology Policy Intern Program at the University of Virginia.

    Spaces are limited: so if you are interested, it is worth registering

    Like

    • Bill says:

      Thanks for passing that along. Glad to see it’s happening. We’ll be attending a similar conference at the Duke Divinity School the following weekend, so we’ll have to pass on this one.

      Like

      • Bob Braxton says:

        when you go by (in NC), “wave at” my Mom and my sister, living in the same house, at nearby Haw River, NC (not a town, just a place name, Orange County).

        Like

  5. El Guapo says:

    Looks like she’ll have some great stories for her classmates!

    Like

  6. claire says:

    ahh, the child…love, faith, trust, joy and hope for others…there is a ‘little’ child in each one of us… u r wonderful grandparents!!!!

    Like

Leave a Reply to Bill Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s