Trying to Stay Positive

Trying to put a field of spoiled hay to good use, we mulched our late tomatoes with some of it yesterday.

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Lydia, our summer intern, did a lot of the work.

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We’ve enjoyed having her on the farm this week and she’s fit right in.

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This has been a near disastrous year for growing vegetables around here.  Last year we couldn’t find markets for all of our produce.  This year we’re having to say no to people nearly every day.  We didn’t even go to the farmer’s market this week, as we are barely producing enough to fill our CSA shares.   It’s by far the worst year for gardening that I can recall.

But I’m trying to stay positive.  The okra is starting to come in.

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And the sweet corn will be ready next week.

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That is, if the the raccoons haven’t eaten it all by then.  Sigh.

Farm living…

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10 comments on “Trying to Stay Positive

  1. shoreacres says:

    The old business about a picture and a thousand words applies. Look at the soil moisture map on Jeff Master’s blog. I’m just to the east of the bright red on the upper texas coast. You’re over there gurgling with the deep greens and blues. I thought the accompanying text was interesting – you’re in one of the states that’s close to setting some records. Of course, we already knew that, didn’t we?

    And, in the “if it’s not one thing” category, I was reading about your raccoons while I was listening to a fellow on the outdoor show talk about the hogs uprooting the deer feeders. That led to some memories of the time the snow monkeys escaped from the research facility over by San Antonio and started showing up on ranches. A couple of ranch hands nearly got fired for too much drinking when they started insisting it was monkeys that were emptying the feeders and tearing up the gardens. 😉

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    • Bill says:

      Wow. That map demonstrates it. We’re right on the Carolina border in the center of the state line. That says our soil moisture is about 100%. In June!
      I just came in from the gardens and it’s all extremely discouraging. The tomatoes are a total loss. We’ve had severe loss or total failures in just about everything we grow (excepting the spring brassicas, which were great). And the change in weather also has increased pest and disease pressure.
      As if all that wasn’t enough, this year (for the first time ever) deer starting eating our okra, watermelon, cantaloupe, and pepper plants. We saved the okra and watermelon but the cantaloupe and peppers are a total loss. They even ate my jalapenos. Just bizarre. It’s not like there isn’t plenty of other stuff to eat around here.
      And the raccoons are destroying the sweet corn. If I can make it just a few more days it will mostly be ripe enough to harvest. Very very frustrating.
      Ok, sorry about all the venting and whining.
      As for the monkeys, thanks for the smiles. I wonder if they would be good at keeping deer away? Hmmm….

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  2. Diane says:

    Our vegetable this year are much the same. A long cold winter and now temperatures over 30C. I wish we had a well, watering on the mains is expensive! Have a good weekend Diane

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    • Bill says:

      Thanks Diane. You too.
      One good thing about not having enough produce to go to the farmer’s market this morning is that I didn’t have to get up before 5, and I have a little time to play on the internet. 🙂
      Our winter was unusually warm, until March. Then it started raining (and snowing) and didn’t stop until last week. What a mess.
      Hoping things cool off for you soon.

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  3. Bob Braxton says:

    those from ‘Nam who cook call those “lady fingers”

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    • Bill says:

      It is called “gumbo” in West Africa and it is from that African word that we get our word for the creole dish. When I went to Haiti for the first time I was surprised and delighted to find that the Haitian Creole word for okra is still “gumbo.”

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  4. I can almost feel your frustration and can certainly understand it…

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    • Bill says:

      I admit to being frustrated. It’s just been a very difficult year for farming so far. But I should be counting my blessings. Tonight we had a delicious supper of food from the farm. I really am trying to stay positive…

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  5. El Guapo says:

    Hope it ends up being a bountiful harvest.
    And go you for participating in an intern program.

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    • Bill says:

      Thanks Guapo. I’m about to go see if the wildlife was feasting on our corn again last night.

      We love helping young people learn about this lifestyle. Last year we had 4 interns. This year we were set to have 3, but 2 had to cancel at the last minute. We’re glad to have Lydia and she seems to enjoying herself, in spite of the blistering heat and disappointing gardens.

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